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Wednesday, April 4
 

TBA

Loyola University Chicago (Applications for fall 2019 accepted until June 30 with limited fellowships!)

Immerse Yourself in Urban Studies in the heart of Chicago. Prepare for leadership in government, nonprofit, and business sectors with Loyola’s two-year Master of Arts in Urban Affairs or Master of Public Policy. Applications for fall 2019 accepted until June 30 with limited fellowships. Learn more at LUC.edu/UAA.



Wednesday April 4, 2018 TBA
TBA

7:00am

8:00am

8:00am

Graduate Student Workshops (Pre-approved participants only)
Workshop Coordinator:
Jocelyn Taliaferro, North Carolina State University


Facilitators:
Martine August, Rutgers University
Susan Clarke, University of Colorado
Prentiss Dantzler, Colorado College
William Holt
, Birmingham-Southern College
Jessaca Lightbourne, Georgia State University
Maria Martinez-Cosio, University of Texas Arlington
Ali Modarres, University of Washington-Tacoma
Michael Leo Owens, Emory University
Jocelyn Taliaferro, North Carolina State University
Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University
Bethany Welch, Aquinas Center Philadelphia
Margaret Wilder, Urban Affairs Association

IMPORTANT
: All pre-approved participants and facilitators should stop by the UAA Registration Office (located on the Concourse Level - 1 floor below the lobby) to pick up their name badges prior to going to the workshop.

Wednesday April 4, 2018 8:00am - 5:00pm
Simcoe (2nd Floor)

11:30am

12:45pm

Tour 7: Walking Tour: Toronto's Resilience to Extreme Weather (12:45pm-3:00pm)
Tour Leader: David MacLeod, City of Toronto Environment and Energy Division
We will depart from the Sheraton lobby and walk across the street to City Hall, taking in some of the architectural features of this iconic building and Nathan Phillips Square.  Inside the building we will discuss aspects of resilient building design.  There will be a discussion on how extreme weather has affected this building and others in the downtown area.  The group will then take a stroll on the green roof of City Hall, where we will consider design and maintenance issues with green roofs. There will be a discussion of different types of green infrastructure as a way to buffer against extreme weather. From the City Hall podium roof vantage point, there will be a discussion of built infrastructure within view that contributes to and detracts from the city's resilience to extreme weather. We will discuss the implications of extreme weather on issues such as backup power in high rise buildings.  From our vantage points around City Hall, we will discuss district energy, failing building envelopes and flooding basements. There will be time to consider advanced approaches such as infrastructure interdependency risk assessment and the use of Geographical Information Systems to inform climate risk decision making. There will be consideration of insurance sector implications of extreme weather and new financial disclosure guidelines on climate risk. The concept of resilience hubs for business and residential areas will be considered. Weaved throughout the discussion will be a description of the City's leading edge engagement with different infrastructure groups and the concept of interdependencies and cascade failure avoidance.

Expect a wide ranging multi-disciplinary commentary about resilience of Toronto to a variety of shocks and stresses. Toronto is considered one of the most resilient cities in the world. Find out for yourself if you think this is true and if Toronto is on the right path forward for climate change resilience in particular. Maybe you have some ideas for Toronto?

Maximum capacity: 20 persons
Method of travel: Walking 


Date: Wednesday, April 4

Approximate time period: 1:00pm—3:00pm 
**Meeting time: 12:45pm in Sheraton Hotel Lobby
Ticket Price: $10.00 USD
 
Click here to purchase tickets for Tour 7: Walking and Van Tour: Toronto's Resilience to Extreme Weather!


Wednesday April 4, 2018 12:45pm - 3:00pm
Meet in hotel lobby at 12:45pm

12:45pm

12:45pm

Tour 6: SOLD OUT------One King (12:45pm-5:00pm)---SOLD OUT
Tour Leader: Paul Bedford, City of Toronto
In 1996 a very innovative zoning change was introduced to two historic manufacturing districts on the edge of Toronto’s downtown core. Jane Jacobs worked with then-Mayor Barbara Hall to establish these “Reinvestment Areas”. They were dubbed “The Two Kings” – King and Parliament; and King and Spadina. The Two Kings are a unique Toronto success story. In the case of King-Spadina the area took on new life – almost immediately. Formerly vacant warehouses and factory buildings were filled with new uses within just a couple of years after the new zoning was implemented and the area has never looked back. Now, a decade later, there is enormous real estate pressure from condominium developers (often aided and abetted by the OMB) who are keen to maximize real estate values which requires the demolition of the historic fabric of the neighbourhood. Will the area be killed by its own success, or will the planners and politicians make sure that the vision that created this lively and vibrant neighbourhood – so essential to the City’s economy - is protected?
On this walk we will, in part, explore one of Jacobs’ precepts in Death and Life of Great American Cities – that “new ideas must use old buildings”. Inside the historic buildings of this neighbourhood (and others like it) – the new ideas, that will fuel our city’s economy long into the future, are percolating. These types of spaces (“a good lot of plain, ordinary, low-value old buildings, including some rundown old buildings”)* are essential and precious to any vibrant urban economy. This walk will commence at the Roastery – the café at the entrance to 401 Richmond. 401 was definitely inspired by Jane’s thinking. We will do a quick tour of parts of the building (taking in the 10 foot square portrait of her created by artists John Scott and Deborah Waddington and roof garden – which Jane loved and wrote about in the New York Times magazine). We will then proceed through the streets of King Spadina and discuss the history of the zoning changes that occurred in ’97 and the impact it had on the area, the buildings and people.


*Death and Life of Great American Cities - Jane Jacobs; Random House; 1961. Chapter 10: The need for aged buildings.


Maximum capacity: 20 persons
Method of travel: Walking


Date: Wednesday, April 4
Approximate time period: 1:00pm—4:30pm or 5:00pm
**Meeting time: 12:45pm in Sheraton Hotel Lobby
Ticket Price: $26.00 USD


Click here to purchase tickets for Tour 6: One King!


Wednesday April 4, 2018 12:45pm - 5:00pm
Meet in hotel lobby at 12:45pm

1:00pm

Teaching Effectiveness Workshop for Instructors (Pre-approved participants only)
IMPORTANT: All pre-approved participants and facilitators should stop by the UAA Registration Office (located on the Concourse Level - 1 floor below the lobby) to pick up their name badges prior to going to the workshop.


For more details about workshop content, schedule, speakers, etc., please visit: http://urbanaffairsassociation.org/conference/teaching-workshop/

Wednesday April 4, 2018 1:00pm - 5:45pm
Elgin (2nd Floor)

4:00pm

6:30pm

 
Thursday, April 5
 

TBA

Loyola University Chicago (Applications for fall 2019 accepted until June 30 with limited fellowships!)

Immerse Yourself in Urban Studies in the heart of Chicago. Prepare for leadership in government, nonprofit, and business sectors with Loyola’s two-year Master of Arts in Urban Affairs or Master of Public Policy. Applications for fall 2019 accepted until June 30 with limited fellowships. Learn more at LUC.edu/UAA.



Thursday April 5, 2018 TBA
TBA

6:58am

6:59am

7:00am

7:14am

7:15am

TH7.15.01 Urban Transformations and Spectacles in Brazil
In 2017, Journal of Urban Affairs published a special issue on the theme “Urban Transformations and Spectacles in Brazil,” featuring a set of articles from scholars in the U.S., Brazil, and Mexico that collectively examine the changing urban governance, politics, and rights to the city in Brazil in the wake of the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympics. This proposed roundtable gets together the editor and authors of the JUA special issue to discuss the highlights of the publication, as well as their current new work. It also invites other colleagues interested in Brazil to join the discussion on the emerging theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues for research on Brazilian cities.




Xuefei Ren, Michigan State University; Thomas Vicino, Northeastern University

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Vicino, Northeastern University

Thomas Vicino, Northeastern University

Professor and Chair, Northeastern University
Thomas J. Vicino is Professor of Political Science, Public Policy, and Urban Affairs and serves as the chair of the Department of Political Science at Northeastern University.


Thursday April 5, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:15am

TH7.15.03 Community Engagement with Communities of Color in Rural and Urban Areas
The purpose of this round-table is to discuss effective community engagement strategies used in urban and rural communities of color. While there are many community engagement frameworks, guides, and toolkits on how to best implement a community engagement strategy, many do not take into consideration how to effectively do so in communities of color. Furthermore, many frameworks fail to consider strategies most effective in engaging members of rural communities compared to strategies most effective in engaging members of urban communities. The discussion leaders have been working for several years in both urban and rural communities in New Orleans, Louisiana, and Mississippi and will provide examples from their experiences providing community engagement technical assistance to community-based organizations.




Jasmine Williams-Washington, Community Science
Deryn Dudley, Community Science


Thursday April 5, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:15am

TH7.15.04 Title: Land Use, Funding and Laws – Oh, My! Exploring the Limits and Opportunities of Local Politics for Affordable Housing
Housing policy is often viewed as a check-list of best practices – appropriate funding or programs that lead to particular outcomes. However, the bulk of housing policy occurs at the local and state levels through local laws, land use and funding. It is also heavily dependent on the politics of the area. The purpose of this round table is to engage researchers in discussion of the way that the (local?) political environment shapes local and state housing policy. The discussion will discuss barriers to effective housing policy, as well as ways that local advocates, government agencies, and residents have used that environment to build momentum and change housing outcomes at the local level.


Kathryn Howell, Virginia Commonwealth University


Thursday April 5, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:15am

TH7.15.05 Urban Green Spaces, Social Justice, and the Pursuit of Health Equity in the United States: Research Highlights
Health equity involves the opportunity of all people to have the highest level of health. Environmental conditions are a key factor that influence the context to achieve health equity. Unfortunately, reoccurring research articulates how socioeconomic gaps and inequitable access to urban green spaces relate to issues in social/environmental justice. This predicament also has implications on urban health and sustainability that should be further explored. This breakfast roundtable will engage participants in an interactive discussion on research highlights on urban green spaces in the quest achieve environmental justice and health equity, particularly in the United States. Key literature on health disparities/inequalities, social determinants of health as well as other issues in urban sustainability will be shared. Local projects that support vulnerable communities achieve health equity will also be covered.

Viniece Jennings, USDA Forest Service.


Thursday April 5, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:15am

TH7.15.06 Alternatives to Market-Driven Reform: Can Cities Address Inequity in Urban Education Through Initiatives for Community Schools?
Over the last twenty years, many American cities have turned to neoliberal policies and practices to reform their school systems. Hoping to boost achievement, city school systems have turned to initiatives for charter schools, closed public schools, and have hired temporary teachers through programs like Teach for America. Despite these efforts at reform, US cities still face intractable problems of lagging academic achievement among students, many of whom are low income and/or Black and Brown. Some have argued that these past efforts have failed because they do not address the outside-of-school factors impacting achievement, like poverty. To meet that challenge, cities like New York, Baltimore, Cincinnati, and Albuquerque are trying another strategy called community schools. Community schools are schools which provide a range of services to address the needs of students, families, and communities. The theory is that these schools will address the outside-of-school factors that prevent low income students from coming to and performing in school, thereby improving achievement. This roundtable will explore the possibilities and challenges of the community schools strategy with a discussion leader who has been directly involved in the community school initiative in Baltimore, MD at the policy and local levels.


Jessica Shiller, Towson University

Speakers
JS

Jessica Shiller

Associate Professor, Towson University


Thursday April 5, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:15am

TH7.15.02 Getting Grants and Contracts: Advice from Senior Scholars
This roundtable will share with attendees the secrets this senior scholar has used to get grants and contracts. Bring questions to the session.


 David Perry, University of Illinois--Chicago


Thursday April 5, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:15am

TH7.15.07 Academic Job Search Strategies
Facilitator will provide guidelines and tips for preparing to submit a package/application for an academic job. The discussion will include information on the differences between tenure and non-tenure track positions; crafting statements of teaching philosophy and research statements; the components of a typical interview; and some basic "do's" and "don'ts" of the process.


Susan E. Clarke, University of Colorado Boulder


Thursday April 5, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

8:00am

Opening Plenary - Justice and Sustainability Within and Beyond the City's Edge (Open to all registrants)--8:00am--9:00am
Toronto has become an international model of alternative approaches to urban policies, particularly in the areas of housing, immigration/diversity, social equity, and environmental sustainability. But significant tensions underlie this impressive image. Rising socio-spatial inequality, escalating housing costs, racialized patterns of growth, and inadequate transportation infrastructure, all threaten the metropolitan region’s future prospects. However, collaborations in planning and policy at the local and regional levels have created opportunities for community engagement, grassroots place-making and larger scale city-building.  The speakers in this plenary explore the challenges of life in this dynamic urban environment, and reveal the roles that citizens and policy can play in defining Toronto now, and for the future.

Shauna Brail, University of Toronto (Moderator)

Speakers:

Sabina Ali, Thorncliffe Park Women's Committee, Chair
Crystal Basi, Toronto Aboriginal Support Services Council, Executive Director
Burkhard Mausberg, The Greenbelt Foundation, Former CEO

Speakers
avatar for Sabina Ali,Thorncliffe Park Women's Committee

Sabina Ali,Thorncliffe Park Women's Committee

Chair
Sabina Ali is the Chair and one of the founding members of Thorncliffe Park Women’s Committee – created by residents to advance a transformative vision for Thorncliffe Park and the surrounding community. Under Ali’s leadership, the Women’s Committee revitalized the local park... Read More →
CB

Crystal Basi, Toronto Aboriginal Support Services Council

Executive Director
Crystal Basi is a mixed heritage person of Scandinavian, French Canadian, Haudenosaunee, and Scottish decent. She works in the community to honour the memory of her granny who endured (and resisted) systemic inequality that impacted her ability to live as an Indigenous person.  Crystal... Read More →
avatar for Burkhard Mausberg, The Greenbelt Foundation

Burkhard Mausberg, The Greenbelt Foundation

Former CEO
Burkhard Mausberg was the founding CEO of the Friends of the Greenbelt Foundation and the Greenbelt Fund for twelve years, making the Greenbelt the most popular and successful environmental initiative in its time.A leader in Ontario’s environmental/food sector, Mausberg has worked... Read More →

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 8:00am - 9:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

9:09am

Concurrent Sessions
Thursday April 5, 2018 9:09am - 10:35am
TBA

9:10am

TH9.10.00 Journal Publishing: What Editors Think You Should Know
Experienced editors explain the basic  guidelines for preparing and submitting manuscripts, and proven  strategies for potential authors. Learn to avoid common mistakes, and  increase the likelihood of finding the most appropriate journal for your  research.

Moderator: Ali Modarres, University of Washington-Tacoma (formerly, Editor of Cities)

Speakers:
Emma Sanders, Routledge/Taylor & Francis
Patrick McGinty, SAGE Publishing
Ali Modarres, University of Washington-Tacoma (formerly, Editor of Cities)

Speakers
Moderator
AM

Ali Modarres

Director, Urban Studies, University of Washington Tacoma

Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Dufferin (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.05 The Spatial Politics of Urban Flood Resilience
Despite centuries of planning and infrastructure intervention, losses from catastrophic flooding continue to grow in cities around the world. In the words of hazards geographer Gilbert White, people appear to continue “knowing better and losing even more.” Notwithstanding claims that Hurricane Harvey was an “equal opportunity disaster,” other recent urban flooding disasters have demonstrated the extent to which both the flood impacts and responses are uneven and deeply shaped by the spatial politics of race and class.


Conventional tools of flood mitigation have also been criticized for their uneven distribution of costs and benefits which can deepen existing socioeconomic inequities. Levees create clear inside/out lines, creating the dangers of both marginalization of those outside protection and facilitation of risk-blind development patterns for those inside. Subsidized flood insurance incentivizes building in risky territory and disproportionately benefits property owners. Networked infrastructure such as utility and drainage systems can have critical and cascading failures. Even flood mitigation measures in building codes may have negative consequences on equity, increasing the cost of housing and disproportionately benefiting residents of newer construction.


Many of the prominent new strategies for urban flood risk mitigation labeled as “green/blue infrastructure" or "resilient urbanism” propose to revise and expand upon these traditional tools. This colloquy examines implications of resilience for spatial politics and the distribution of risks and benefits with urban flood risk. Are green/blue infrastructures creating "premium ecological enclaves” and “green gentrification”? How can their biophysical innovations be drivers of greater spatial justice in cities? Participants will discuss projects and processes from cities across the globe to illuminate the opportunities and challenges in addressing present flood hazards and future climate change adaptations. 


Moderator: Zachary Lamb, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 


Spatial Politics of Flood Insurance Mapping - Community Collaboration or Contestation? (New York City and Greater Boston) 
Michael Wilson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


The Design-Politics of Urban Flooding from Levee-Enabled Growth to Climate-Adaptive Resilience (New Orleans and Dhaka) 
Zachary Lamb, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


The Design-Politics of Coastal Sustainability and Planning for Community Resilience (Louisiana)
Traci Birch, Louisiana State University


The Spatial Politics of Coastal Green Infrastructure - Integrating Science and Practice (USA) 
Billy Fleming, University of Pennsylvania


Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Maple East (Mezzanine Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.15 Collaborative Methods in Community Engaged Action Oriented Research in Chicago
This session will focus on the methods researchers and practitioners use in collaborating on research meant to address social problems in the Chicago area. Each speaker will discuss his/her methodological approach to working on urban research in Chicago and how that allowed him/her to inform changes in the city itself. In particular, speakers will address directing collaborative research efforts as heads of research centers, working with researchers to transform services for urban families experiencing domestic violence, and how research access was negotiated to Chicago’s homeless population to determine the impact of a housing-first pilot program. Comments will focus on promising approaches to collaborative action-oriented research that enable partnerships to flourish between urban communities, practitioners, service providers, and the researchers and how those relationships become central to doing the research effectively.


Moderator: Gina Spitz, Loyola University Chicago


Research Approaches to Transform Services for Urban Families Experiencing Domestic Violence
Leslie Landis, Cook County Domestic Violence Court


Negotiating Research Access to Chicago’s Homeless Population to Determine the Impact of a Housing-First Pilot Program
Teresa Neumann Dimpfl, Loyola University Chicago


Cultivating Faculty Researcher-Community Partnerships in Action-Oriented Urban Research
Howard Rosing, DePaul University


Flexible Nethodological Approaches to Community Action Research in Chicago
David Van Zytveld, Loyola University Chicago


Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Kent (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.01 Staying in Place or Moving Out: Untangling the Intricacy of Housing Stability and Residential Mobility in the U.S.
This panel will discuss housing stability and residential mobility by looking at both national and localized studies in the United States for the general population, with emphasis on low-income households. The national studies provide a greater understanding of length of stay for low-income households in assisted housing, and how length of residence, among other factors, impacts neighborhood crime rates. The localized studies use data from the Chicago metropolitan area to examine how housing stability influences residential mobility, Southern California to assess the neighborhood determinants of eviction, and Harris County, Texas to shed light on mobility outcomes, specifically neighborhood quality, for low-income renters. Together these studies frame an important policy discussion on the role of housing stability and residential mobility in communities across the nation.
Moderator: Kirk McClure, University of Kansas


Length of Stay in Assisted: Who Stays and Who Leaves? 
Kirk McClure, University of Kansas


Stable Housing and Neighborhood Crime Rates: An Examination of Main and Moderating Effects 
Rebecca Walter, University of Washington; Marie Tillyer, The University of Texas at San Antonio; Ruoniu (Vince) Wang, Grounded Solutions Network


How Does Neighborhood Housing Stability Influence Residential Mobility Pathways? 
Andrew Greenlee, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Housing Choice Voucher Householders’ Locational Outcomes 
Han John Park, Rice University

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Greenlee

Andrew Greenlee

Assistant Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Kirk McClure, University of Kansas

Kirk McClure, University of Kansas

Professor, University of Kansas
McClure teaches and conducts research in the area of housing market behavior and affordable housing policy.

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Wentworth (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.03 Challenges to Self-Sufficiency for Housing Residents
Evictions in Gentrifying Rio de Janeiro and San Francisco: Revanchist Displacement 
Sukari Ivester, California State University, East Bay


An Analysis of the Outcomes of the Family Self-Sufficiency Program in Pittsburgh 
Jennifer Bert, University of Pittsburgh


What Explains the Low Employment Rates Among Public Housing Residents? 
William Rohe, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Michael Webb, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
City Hall Room (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.04 Housing Quality and Tenant Protections

When is Affordable Housing Better Quality Housing? Tenant Protections and Code Enforcement in Austin, Texas 
Elizabeth J Mueller, University of Texas at Austin; Ian Becker, University of Texas at Austin

The Matrix of Rights Denial: Policies, Practices and Contextual Constraints Affecting Housing Rights in Occupied Palestinian Territories 
Nuha Dwaikat Shaer, McGill University

The Dangers of Ignoring Demographics in Assistance Programs: An Analysis of the One-to Four-Family Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Program 
Camden Miller, University at Buffalo, State University of New York


Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Elgin (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.06 Equitable Redevelopment or Just as Good as it Gets: Understanding the Limits and Opportunities for Preventing Displacement in Gentrifying Neighborhoods
The inevitability of displacement – social, economic and political – has been a source of intense debate as cities, led by individual homeowners, public tax incentives, and direct public and private investment, have seen their neighborhoods change. However, many local governments, community-based organizations, tenant associations, and neighborhood advocacy groups have resisted the inevitability of displacement through affordable housing development, public space initiatives and community engagement efforts. This panel explores the ways that different communities across the country have focused on engaging and supporting existing residents as neighborhoods change to understand what it means to stay and on what terms residents remain in their communities as a result.


Moderator: Gerardo Sandoval, University of Oregon

"We'll Believe It When We See It": Opportunities and Challenges in Resident-Led Preservation of Affordable Housing 
Kathryn Howell, Virginia Commonwealth University

Somos de Langley Park: The Battle for Equitable Suburban Development along Maryland’s Purple Line 
Willow Lung-Amam, University of Maryland - College Park

Equity, Opportunity, and the Regional Planning Process: Data and Mapping in Five U.S. Metropolitan Areas
Casey Dawkins, University of Maryland, College Park; Nicholas Finio, University of Maryland, College Park; Willow Lung-Amam, University of Maryland, College Park; Willow Lung-Amam, University of Maryland, College Park; Brittany Wong, University of Maryland, College Park




Speakers
BW

Brittany Wong, University of Maryland, College Park

University of Maryland, College Park
PhD Student, Urban and Regional Planning & Design School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation University of Maryland, College Park M.Arch -- Penn State // B.Arch -- University of Arizona
avatar for Kathryn Howell, Virginia Commonwealth University

Kathryn Howell, Virginia Commonwealth University

Assistant Professor, Virginia Commonwealth University

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Churchill (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.07 Civic/Public Engagement Strategies for Social Justice across Urban Policy Domains: Urban Resilience, Youth-Adult Partnerships, and School Nutrition
This comparative panel examines the use of civic/public engagement strategies in various urban policy domains in order to improve social justice and policy reform outcomes: enhancing disaster urban resilience, creating age-friendly cities, disseminating a social justice curriculum though youth-adult partnerships, and expanding community-driven urban school nutrition. It draws evidence from case-studies in the San Francisco Bay Area and Worcester (MA). All panelists, from and academia and the public sector, are informed by an engaged scholarship approach with direct participation in the policy efforts. The use of civic/public engagement strategies seems to be an asset in social justice policy reform, yet the challenges to sustain such strategies are strong.


Moderator: Ramon Borges-Mendez, Clark University


Public Engagement Methods and Outcomes: Case Evidence from the San Francisco Bay Area 
Jennifer Shea, San Francisco State University


Youth Civic Engagement through a Social Justice Approach to Youth-Adult Partnership 
Laurie Ross, Clark University


The Worcester (MA) Public Schools Nutrition Program: Cooking Civic Engagement and Policy Reform 
Ramon Borges-Mendez, Clark University; Donna Lombardi, Worcester Public Schools

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Ross, Clark University

Laurie Ross, Clark University

Project Director, Worcester ACTs/Clark University
Laurie Ross, PhD, is an associate professor at Clark University and engages in community-based action research projects in Worcester on topics such as youth and gang violence, youth and young adult homelessness, and youth worker professional education. For the past twelve years, Ross... Read More →

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Simcoe (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.08 Public Policies and Non-profit Organizations
If It Ain’t Broke, Why Fix it? Evaluating the Impact of a Fair Share Strategy in a City with an Equal Distribution of Group Homes 
Matan E. Singer, University of Michigan


The Razor’s Edge: Social Impact Bonds and the Financialization of Early Childhood Services 
Allison Tse, Cornell University; Mildred Warner, Cornell University


Revitalizing American Neighborhoods: Do Community Based Development Organizations Matter?
Nathaniel Wright, Texas Tech University; Frank Thames, Texas Tech University


Social Protections in the New Administration: Los Angeles Nonprofit Responses Amidst Political Changes
C. Aujean Lee, University of California, Los Angeles

Speakers
Moderator
avatar for Nathaniel Wright

Nathaniel Wright

Assistant Professor, Texas Tech University
Dr. Nathaniel Wright received his B.A. and Masters of Public Administration from Binghamton University (2005, 2006); and Ph.D. in Public Administration from the University of Kansas (2014). Dr. Wright conducts research on the role that social advocacy nonprofits play in creating sustainable... Read More →

Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Maple West (Mezzanine Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.09 Queer (Sub)Urban Activisms--Mini Track Sponsored by MCRI Global Suburbanism/Urban Studies at York University
Research into queer activist geographies has focused on political challenges to the heteronormative social order as exemplified by public demonstrations and public space appropriations in large cities. One of the challenges with the emerging urban scholarship on queer activisms is its metronormative focus on the central areas of world gay cities and on highly visible, spectacular, and media-covered activisms. This geographic focus is due, in part, to the often greater concentration of LGBTQ2S organizations, queer-friendly spaces, and LGBTQ2S-identified residents in central city areas, an association between urbanism and sexual liberation, and the symbolism of downtown public spaces as reference points for the public sphere itself. But LGBTQ2S activisms occur within and beyond the city’s edge, in many kinds of contexts and spaces in the global North and South and often in response to demographic shifts and population displacements. LGBTQ2S activisms also involve different approaches and strategies while prioritizing issues of social inclusion, health, safety, and political visibility in response to shifting and complex socio-spatial dynamics and lived realities within city-regions. Much of this activism is informal and ephemeral in its responsiveness to local social and health service needs, is reliant upon community-based voluntary labour and social networks that circulate through the private and public spheres, is supported by practices of queer allyship, and is not underwritten by substantial public or private sector infrastructure, staffing, or programming investments. This session seeks to multiply the scholarly portraits and theoretical understandings of LGBTQ2S activisms by interrogating the non-metrocentric and perhaps less visible, grassroots, and micro spatial scales and organizational strategies of queer political (sub)urban interventions.


Moderator: Julie Podmore, John Abbott College


Displaced Queers: Suburban LGBTQ2S Activisms in the Vancouver City Region 
Julie Podmore, John Abbott College; Alison Bain, York University


Sub/Urban Queer Activism: Re/Placing Diva Citizenship 
Patricia Wood, York University


Youth for A Change: Young, Queer, and Here as Advocates, Educators, and Activists 
Jennifer Marchbank, Simon Fraser University


Endowed with a Visual Archive: Encountering an LGBTTTI Sector in Southern Mexico Through Images of Pride Marches 
William Payne, York University





Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Kenora (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.10 The Possibilities of Historic Preservation as Tool for Community Empowerment, Engagement, and Collaboration
Building Sense of Belonging in Norman City’s Residents through Chautauqua Historic District Development 
Petya Stefanoff, University of Oklahoma


Visualizing Public Participation in Preservation Practice: Applying Fung’s Democracy Cube to Historic Preservation Planning 
Douglas Appler, University of Kentucky


The Possibilities of Collaborative Photography:  Countering Stigmas Associated with Deindustrialized Urban Spaces 
Andrea Klimt, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth


Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Mackenzie (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.11 Urban Outcomes from Education Policy
Homeless and Hungry in the Pursuit of Higher Education 
S. Nicole Diggs, California State University East Bay 

Regent Park Pathways to Education: A Qualitative Study of Enhancing Student Opportunities and Success in Toronto, Canada 
Dan Zuberi, University of Toronto

Public Accountability and Modes of Resistance to Public School Sales and Reuse in Philadelphia
Ariel H. Bierbaum, University of Maryland 

The Emergence of University-School Partnerships: A Comparative Case Study Analysis of Two Public Schools Built by Universities in Small Cities
Matthew Closter, Rutgers University - Camden

Slap Suits and Fake Ethics Complaints: The Tactics of Vulture Hedge Funds and Market-Based Education Reformers
Julia Rubin, Rutgers University


Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Huron (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.12 Ethnic Policies, Politics and Belonging 
The Interplay of Nationalism and Anti-Blackness in the Reception of Haitians in Canada 
Carlo Handy Charles, York University

Advocating for Many Under One Roof: Using Multiple Identities in an Asian American Advocacy and Social Services Organization 
Haegi Kwon, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Negotiating Diasporic Identities in the Landscapes of Tourism: The Visibility of Bangladeshi Street-vendors in Rome, Italy
Maria Francesca Piazzoni, University of Southern California


Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Chestnut East (Mezzanine Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.13 Comparative Urban Analysis from the Global South
The Relationship Between Globalization and Housing Inequality in Developing Countries: A Multilevel Analysis
Byungwon Woo, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies; Hee-Jung Jun, Sungkyunkwan University; Seoyeon Park, Sungkyunkwan University


The NGO Effect: Isomorphism, Global Scripts, and Solutions for the Urban Poor 
Gonçalo Borges, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee


Globalization’s Paradoxes in Cities as Opportunities for Urban Affairs Programs: Insights from the Arab Gulf Region 
Jerry Kolo, American University of Sharjah; Sandra Schrouder, Barry University, Miami


Adaptable Imported Urban Planning Practices? Foreign And Local Professionals’ View of a North-to-South Technical Assistance Project in Palestine
Marco Chitti, Université de Montréal


Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Roosevelt (2nd Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.14 Days of Future Past: Preservation and Cultural Identity Meet Economic Development
Orange Agendas: Transportation Infrastructure, Awakened Identity, and Heritage Preservation in Lahore, Pakistan
Ziad Qureshi, University of Houston; Naeem Qureshi, Progressive Consulting Engineers, Incorporated


Locating Levers: Tourism and Development in Small Urban Centers in Vietnam
Priyam Das, University of Hawaii at Manoa


Spatial Analysis of Coexisting Cultural Urban Regeneration Processes and Their Outcomes in Kampong Glam, Singapore
Vinay Kumar, University at Buffalo


China-Canada Collaborative Learning on Planning for Multicultural Urban Areas and Heritage Conservation: Evidence from the Front Lines
John Meligrana, Queen's University


Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Willow Centre (Mezzanine Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.16 Sustainability Transitions in Local Government
Do Sustainability Plans Matter? A comparison of Local Government Sustainability Actions From 2010 to 2015 
Lu Liao, Cornell University; George Homsy, Binghamton University; Mildred Warner, Cornell University

Beyond the City: Controversy Over Rapidly Expanding Industrial Agriculture Practices in Wisconsin
Jill McNew-Birren, Marquette University; Jennifer Gaul-Stout, Marquette University; Amber Wichowsky, Marquette University

Legitimacy, Inclusion, and Equity in Urban Environmental Governance: Examples from the Vancouver and Toronto Metropolitan Areas
Julie Hagan, Laval University

Climate (Non-)Governance in the Conservative City: Coal-fired Power Plants and the Search for Transpartisan Urban Sustainability
Corina McKendry, Colorado College


Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Chestnut West (Mezzanine Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.17 Infrastructure, Transportation and Access in International Context
Global Flows, Local Conflicts and the Challenge of Urban Governance: Managing the Urban‑Airport Interface in London and the South East of England 
Evan McDonough, University of Luxembourg


The Emergence of a Progressive, Cosmopolitan World City within an Autocratic State: The Rise of Moscow, Russia 
Richard Jelier, Grand Valley State University


Violence and Access to Basic Services in Informal Urban Communities 
Carlos Rufin, Suffolk University


Discovering Alternative Scenarios for Sustainable Urban Transportation 
Jude Herijadi Kurniawaw, University of Waterloo


Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Willow West (Mezzanine Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.18 Vertical Urbanisms and the Regulatory Production of Urban Volumes
This panel aims at contributing to the debates about the diversity of “vertical urbanisms” (Harris, 2014) and vertical patterns of urbanization. It will do so by unpacking the complex relationship between regulatory frameworks that produce and distribute the rights to built in the air or underground with the dynamics of capital accumulation through the built environment. This panel seeks to explore the lesser-known diversity of policies, rules and regulations that allow for the vertical expansion of the urban fabric and the conflicts and controversies it entails with a socio-technical approach.


Moderator: Gillad Rosen, Hebew University in Jerusalem 


A Socio-Technical Approach to Contemporary Verticalization in Paris 
Martine Drozdz, East Paris University


Reaching New Heights: Post-Politicizing High-Rise Planning in Jerusalem 
Igal Charney, University of Haifa; Gillad Rosen, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem


Transfer of Building Rights: The Perverse Effects of the “Compensation” Mechanism in Rome 
Aurélien Delpirou, Urban Planning School of Paris


Governing the Towers Projects in the European “Second City” The Case of Lyon, France 
Manuel Appert, Lyon University; Maxime Huré, University of Geneva; Christian Montes, Lyon University


Highrise Buildings, Urban Tissue and Urban Regulation: Some Questions in São Paulo
Manoel Rodrigues Alves, Universidade de São Paulo


Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Linden (Mezzanine Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.19 Tourism-related Initiatives--Who Pays? Who Benefits?
Space Available Revisited: Convention Center Development and Market Realities 
Heywood Sanders, University of Texas at San Antonio

The Impact of the 2016 Republican National Convention on Cleveland
Candi Clouse, Cleveland State University
Iryna Lendel, Cleveland State University; Luke Seaberg, Cleveland State University; Luke Seaberg, Cleveland State University

City Marketing in Strategic Urban Planning: The Case of Porto Maravilha’s Urban Legacy in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 
Laysa Abchiche, Universidade de Brasília; Maria do Carmo De lima Bezerra, Universidade de Brasília

Built on Hope and Tax Credits: How a Sports and Entertainment District Revitalized Downtown New Orleans 

Casey Schreiber, Dillard University

Speakers
CS

Casey Schreiber, Dillard University

Bleu Devils: History of Athletics at Dillard University, Dillard University
Dillard University, a private, liberal arts, historically black college in New Orleans, Louisiana has been contributing to positive outcomes for African American men and women since 1869. Using a historical perspective, this paper gives voice to the role of sports in the 150 year... Read More →

Moderator
avatar for Candi Clouse, Cleveland State University

Candi Clouse, Cleveland State University

Program Manager, Center for Economic Development, Cleveland State University
Candi Clouse is the Program Manager in the Center for Economic Development at the Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University. In her current role, she supports the center with data analysis, economic impact modeling, and industry research. Ms. Clouse... Read More →

Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Pine West (Mezzanine Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.20 Land, Urbanization & Expropriation - I
Access to land is at the heart of political-economic debates over urbanization. These debates have traditionally placed the role of capital accumulation and class struggle at the center of how urban land markets are understood (Harvey, 1978; Christophers, 2011). Following recent efforts to expand this capital-centric lens (Fraser, 2014, Glassman, 2006), this session seeks to consider land through the framework of expropriation, a concept that includes (economic) accumulation by dispossession, but also includes forms of dispossession that operate through other forms of domination such as racism and white supremacy, patriarchy, colonialism, and settler-colonialism. In the contemporary context of land investment and urbanization functioning as primary conduits for financial accumulation, how is exclusion from land carried out, justified, and contested?
These two sessions explore policy, the state, and economic development in relation to frontiers of land commodification and expropriation. Theoretically and empirically based papers analyze historical and contemporary practices of, justifications for, and contestations of exclusion, oppression, and expropriation.

Moderator: Lee Polonsky, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Condemnation as a Tool of Economic Development Practice: Lessons from the South Inlet Neighborhood of Atlantic City, New Jersey
Evan R. Sweet, AKRF Inc & Columbia University


Mapping Dispossession: Eviction, Foreclosure and the Multiple Geographies of Housing Instability in Lexington, Kentucky 
Taylor Shelton, Mississippi State University


The “Natures” of Gentrification: Healthism and Creeping Enclosure in Parkdale and the Lower Don, Toronto 
Jessica Parish, York University


Land Markets as Expropriation: The Market Value Analysis in Philadelphia 
Lee Polonsky, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey


Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Willow East (Mezzanine Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.21 What Explains Political Attitudes and Representation?

The Influence of Gender on Support for EU Integration Among the Urban Polish Youth 
Adrian Favero, University of Edinburgh


Participation of Local Citizens in Decision Making of Municipalities in Hungary 

Janos B. Kocsis, Corvinus University of Budapest


Why Do Cities "Ban the Box"? Race, Representation, and Organizing 
Michael Owens, Emory University; Anna Gundersun, Emory University


Exploring Minority Representation on County Governing Boards 
Al Gourrier, University of Baltimore; Leander Kellogg, University of North Georgia




Speakers
avatar for Al Gourrier, University of Baltimore

Al Gourrier, University of Baltimore

Assistant Professor, University of Baltimore
avatar for Janos B. Kocsis, Corvinus University of Budapest

Janos B. Kocsis, Corvinus University of Budapest

Higher Education, Corvinus University of Budapest
Graduated in Hungary and in the UK, I have been teaching students in various Urban Development (Economics MSc) programmes for over 15 years. My foci of interest are urban sprawl, decay and gentrification, local decision-making, local development, especially in Eastern Central Europe... Read More →

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Pine East (Mezzanine Floor)

9:10am

TH9.10.22 Understanding the Policy and Planning Influences of Urban Growth and Shrinkage
Macro Explorations of Network Composition and Change in Intergovernmental Service Agreements: An Initial Analysis and Research Agenda 
Jered Carr, University of Illinois at Chicago; Michael Siciliano, University of Illinois at Chicago; Victor Hugg, University of Illinois at Chicago

Parallel Patterns of Growth and Shrinkage in Urbanized China: The Geographic Diversity of State Rescaling 
Yuanshuo Xu, Cornell University

Planning for Shrinkage: A Synthesis of Planning Approaches in Depopulating U.S. Cities 
Megan Heim-LaFrombois, Auburn University; Yunmi Park, Auburn University; Galen Newman, Texas A&M University; and Daniel Yurcaba, Auburn University

 


Thursday April 5, 2018 9:10am - 10:35am
Cedar (Mezzanine Floor)

10:35am

10:49am

Concurrent Sessions
Thursday April 5, 2018 10:49am - 12:15pm
TBA

10:50am

TH10.50.01 Fight to Stay---The Right to Defend Your Home, a Critical Piece in the Fight Against Gentrification
This session will tell the story of the Right to Counsel Coalition, which successfully launched a 3 year campaign to make New York City the first city in the US to guarantee a right to an attorney to tenants facing eviction. Speakers will draw insights from their perspectives about how this right is key to fighting gentrification as well as how to implement a new law in a way that creates a right and builds tenant power. Speakers will represent the different perspectives of the coalition: lawyers, advocates and tenants. They will also share lessons learned from the coalition and the campaign, offering insights for other cities who are facing mass evictions and looking for effective tools. They will also discuss the right to defending your home and how it can be used as an organizing tool towards a vision of a right to housing.


Moderator: Susanna Blankley, Right to Counsel NYC Coalition



Movement Lawyering 
Marika Dias, Legal Services NYC


Building Tenant Power--A Tenant Perspective 
Randy Dillard, CASA


Building Tenant Power--A Community Organizer Perspective
Lorena Lopez, Catholic Migration Services

Speakers
MD

Marika Dias

Director - Tenant Rights Coalition, Legal Services NYC
RD

Randy Dillard

Community Aciton For Safe Apartments

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Wentworth (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.03 Funding Supportive Services that Meet the Needs of Low-Income Families Living in Affordable Housing
Housing as a platform for supportive services is an effective way to reach low-income families living in public housing or other types of supportive or mixed-income communities. Urban Institute researchers have expanded upon this approach to reach the highest-need families where they live, by including or partnering with residents to build and improve the models of service delivery. This colloquy will highlight the Housing Opportunity and Services Together (HOST) research demonstration focused on wrap around, two-generation services for families and discuss on how Public Housing Authorities (PHAs) and other owners and operators of assisted housing can find creative ways to finance supportive services for residents. Presenters will discuss promising examples of partnerships between public housing authorities, human service providers, community residents, researchers, and policy makers to simultaneously finance, design, implement, study, and inform policies that support low-income families.


Moderator: Mary Bogle, Urban Institute

The HOST Demonstration and Urban Institute’s Applied Research Demonstrations Focused on Wrap Around, Two-Generation Services for Families 
Susan Popkin, Urban Institute

Implementation and Financing of a Partnerships Between the PHA, Service Providers, Residents, Researchers, and Policy Makers in Portland, OR 
Rachel Langford, HomeForward

Financing Supportive Services in Affordable Housing
Rhae Parkes, EJP Consulting


Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
City Hall Room (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.05 Environmental Justice Academy Principles: From Instruction to Application
The colloquy will provide participants insight about the Environmental Justice Academy principles and how graduates utilize acquired knowledge and skills in practical ways. The Environmental Justice Academy (EJA) "is a rigorous, nine-month leadership development program designed to cultivate skills [that] participants can use to identify and address environmental challenges in their communities." The Environmental Protection Agency's collaborative problem solving model is central to the EJA's curriculum. Graduates leave the program equipped to explore possible solutions to a variety of concerns resulting from the disparate impact of social and environmental inequities experienced by underserved and marginalized communities. A diverse group of four speakers representing academia, public, private and non-profit organizations will focus upon specific ways in which they engage their skills in different situations. The first speaker will provide an overview of the Environmental Justice Academy, including basic principles and comprehensive teachings. Other colloquy presenters will: discuss the incorporation of EJA precepts into developing an ecodistrict; illustrate the benefits of community based participatory research in creating viable community profiles; and examine how the collaborative problem solving model is being used engage community members in building partnerships to address environmental challenges. Speakers approach each topic from reflective experiences and individual perspectives. Their work illuminates the broad applicability of environmental justice principles and the collaborative problem solving model to community work, development plans, and organization environments.
1. Introduce the fundamental principles and teachings of the Environmental Justice Leadership Academy.
2. Community based participatory research as a conduit to foregrounding community profiles and clarifying needs of marginalized communities.
3. Illuminate by specific example how the collaborative problem solving model is being used to engage community members and partners to address contamination and blight.
4. Illustrate the application of EJA principles to the ECO District Imperative, disaster preparedness and resilience in underserved communities.
5. Create a roadmap that incorporates sustainability principles to promote healthy, resilient communities and confront pressing global challenges.


Moderator: Joan Wesley, Jackson State University


Community Based Participatory Research as a Conduit to Foregrounding Community Profiles and Clarifying Needs of Marginalized Communities
Joan Wesley, Jackson State University


Illustrate the Application of EJA Principles to the ECO District Imperative, Disaster Preparedness and Resilience in Underserved Communities 
Garry Harris, Center for Sustainable Communities


Create a Roadmap that Incorporates Sustainability Principles to Promote Healthy, Resilient Communities and Confront Pressing Global Challenges 
Chandra Farley, Southface Energy Institute


Illuminate by Specific Example How the Collaborative Problem Solving Model is Being Employed for EPA’s Community Engagement University 
Gwendylon Smith, Collier Heights Community Association


Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Chestnut West (Mezzanine Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.11 The Fight for America’s Schools: Grassroots Activism in Education
The colloquy will discuss themes addressed in the book, The Fight for America’s Schools: Grassroots Activism in Education, Barbara Ferman (ed) (2017, Harvard Education Press). The book tackles recent changes in the landscape of education policy that have prompted significant alterations in the politics of education. Collectively, No Child Left Behind, Race to the Top, the Common Core State Standards, and now the Every Student Succeeds Act have chipped away at the traditional center of community control—a trend reinforced by the charter movement, school closures, and state takeovers of some urban schools. At the same time, market-based reforms have sparked resistance from teachers, parents, students, and community groups. The book explores grassroots organizing campaigns in Philadelphia and its suburbs, Camden and Newark, and the state of New Jersey, describing the reconfiguration of historical alliances, the mobilization of new organizations, and the potential for new coalitions that provide a countervailing force to established political configurations and strive to preserve education as a public good. All of the speakers are contributors to the book.


Moderator: Toynessa Kennedy, Mills College (California)

Statewide Organizing 
Julia Sass Rubin, Rutgers University


Grassroots Activism in Philadelphia 
Elaine Simon, University of Pennsylvania


The Changed Landscape of Education Politics: Lessons from the Grassroots
Barbara Ferman, Temple University


Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Huron (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.19 How the University Can Help Save the City: Lessons Learned and New Insights
The City of Hartford, Connecticut, is in trouble. Financially it teeters on the brink of bankruptcy, affecting its schools, public services, and so much more. Hartford is not unique. Other mid-sized cities in the US have faced or are facing similar extreme economic trials. In August 2017, the University of Connecticut moved its Greater Hartford regional campus from a suburban area into downtown Hartford. The university, city, and state hope that the university can contribute to the city’s economic recovery. Certainly its presence is bringing students, faculty, and staff to downtown businesses, especially to coffee shops, restaurants, and bars. And, of course, even before the move programs on the campus (e.g., social work, urban and community studies, business) have been engaged with the community through service learning, engaged scholarship, and student internships. Still, there is more to creating a livable city than supporting downtown retail and student projects in the community. It is time to think about bigger impacts in university-community collaborations. In this colloquy, we invite urban scholars from public universities in other distressed cities to share their experiences. The discussion will focus on ways that the universities have improved life for residents and for the city as a whole, with a desire to share ideas and brainstorm new ones. 


Moderator: Louise Simmons, University of Connecticut 

Similarities and Differences in Public and Private University Community Engagement 
Meagan Ehlenz, Arizona State University

Experiences in University-Community Collaborations in New Orleans 
Marla Nelson, University of New Orleans

Experiences in University-Community Collaborations in Orlando and Elsewhere 
Robyne Stevenson, University of Central Florida

Experiences in University-Community Collaborations in Buffalo 
Henry Taylor, University at Buffalo

Experiences in University-Community Collaborations in Newark
Sherri-Ann P. Butterfield, Rutgers University, Newark

Summing Up the Discussion with a Focus on Action Items 
Edith Barrett, University of Connecticut


Speakers
avatar for Edith Barrett

Edith Barrett

Director, Urban and Community Studies, University of Connecticut
ME

Meagan Ehlenz

Arizona State University
avatar for Robyne Stevenson, University of Central Florida

Robyne Stevenson, University of Central Florida

Visiting Professor, University of Central Florida
I am a pracademic, focused on urban community development and issues related to oppression.

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Simcoe (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.00 Negotiating Participation: Urban Neighborhoods and the Potential of Resident Engagement
Resident participation and engagement are often understood to be central features of any effort in neighborhood betterment and community development. Given the importance of participation and engagement, this session brings together work on efforts such as participatory budgeting, housing activism, and the coproduction of public service delivery to provide a nuanced rendering of participation in cities throughout the United States. In doing so, the challenges, tensions, and possibilities for participation to shape neighborhoods and the lives of those in them are brought into view. Contributors provide theoretical, methodological, and practical insight that will be useful for both scholars and practitioners studying community development and neighborhood change. This session also brings together scholars who have contributed to a recently published book titled, Neighborhood Change and Neighborhood Action: The Struggle to Create Neighborhoods that Serve Human Needs (R. Allen Hays, editor).


Moderator: R. Allen Hays, University of Northern Iowa


Neighborhood Change: Developing a Comprehensive Model
R. Allen Hays, University of Northern Iowa


Formations of Participation: The Pathways of Emergent Community Land Trusts 
Jakob Schneider, The Graduate Center, CUNY; Claire Cahen, The Graduate Center, CUNY; Susan Saegert, The Graduate Center, CUNY


Designing Participatory Processes for Learning in Neighborhood Level Democratic Activity 
Jose Melendez, University of Illinois - Chicago

Community-Led Social Housing Regeneration: Between the Formal and the Informal 
Pablo Sendra, University College London; Daniel Fitzpatrick, University College London

Speakers
Moderator
avatar for R. Allen Hays

R. Allen Hays

Director, Graduate Program in Public Policy, University of Northern Iowa
Housing, neighborhood organization and participation, anti-racism work, and social justice

Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Elgin (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.02 Inclusive Urban Policies: Possibilities and Limitations for Equitable Outcomes
In response to the conceptual and real challenges of integration and the growing awareness of equity-oriented approaches, policy organizations, foundations and other institutions are advancing a set of policies under a broad agenda of “inclusion.” In part, contemporary inclusionary urban policy strategies can be viewed as advancing useful approaches aimed at creating more integrated spaces, while also ensuring particular benefits for marginalized populations. For example, inclusionary housing/zoning policies are designed to ensure affordable housing units for low-income households in market-rate buildings, while special taxing districts are designed to capture financial resources for poor neighborhoods. Yet, these and other inclusionary policies may actually fall short of producing benefits for low-income households and communities of color once implemented. Rather, inclusionary policies may reproduce the same strains of structural racism and exclusion that their policy advocates seek to counteract.
How do we have more comprehensive discussions about how to effectively advance racial and economic justice for people of color and people of low income within the context of inclusionary policies? Speakers will present related research papers and draw participants into a discussion about the possibilities and limitations of contemporary strategies aimed at inclusion and equity. First, Spader and Rieger examine recent trends in the location and composition of integrated neighborhoods in large metropolitan areas. Two papers about St. Louis and Nashville, presented by Metzger and Fraser respectively, share local actions being taken to address inequity and exclusion. Finally, presentations by Khare and Pendall respectively, places these challenges of inclusionary policies and politics within broader conceptual frameworks, seeking to advance a set of arguments about how and why particular elements of policy design and implementation matter for generating social and economic benefits for households and communities that are historically oppressed.


Moderator: Amy Khare, Case Western Reserve University


Patterns and Trends of Residential Integration in the U.S. Since 2000 
Jonathan Spader, Harvard University; Shannon Rieger, Harvard University

Fighting for Government Transparency and Racial Equity in the Use of Local Tax Incentives: A St. Louis Case Study 
Molly Metzger, Washington University in St. Louis; Nay'Chelle Harris, Washington University in St. Louis

The Politics of Property & Inclusionary Zoning in Nashville 
James Fraser, Vanderbilt University

Towards Inclusion and Equity: Advancing Change in the Chicago Region
Amy Khare, Case Western Reserve University

Collective Action for Urban Inclusion: Lessons from Recent Practice 
Rolf Pendall, The Urban Institute

Speakers
Moderator
avatar for Amy Khare, Case Western Reserve University

Amy Khare, Case Western Reserve University

Assistant Professor & Research Director of the National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities, Case Western Reserve University, Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Churchill (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.04 Place Attachment and Residential Preferences
Satisfied with People or Place?: Place attachment Matters as Mediators? 
Kiduk Park, The Ohio State University


Residential Location Choices of Millennials – Evidence from the Chicago Region 
Yiyuan Wang, University of Illinois; Bumsoo Lee, University of Illinois


Identifying Regional Determinants of Housing Instability in the United States: Evidence from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics
Seungbeom Kang, The Ohio State University


Neighborhood Perceptions and Household Relocations: Evidence from the Making Connections Initiative 
Antwan Jones, George Washington University; Prentiss Dantzler, Colorado College


Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Willow East (Mezzanine Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.06 City for All: Integration and Reintegration of Refugees and Immigrants
The unprecedented influx of refugees in many European and American cities created a sense of “crisis” for government officials and agencies as well as public and private human service organizations. This panel bring together researchers and practitioners from several countries who are studying responses to the new challenges cities face as they try to integrate newcomers into their communities as well as the lessons learned from experiences with previous waves of immigrants.


Moderator: Gordana Rabrenovic, Northeastern University


Starting All Over Again. Struggles, Victories and Resilience Among Highly Educated Syrian Refugees in Dutch Big Cities 
Maurice Crul, Erasmus University Rotterdam; Frans Lelie, Free University Amsterdam


Refugee Students in Urban Schools in Sweden 
Nihad Bunar, Stockholm University


Massive Refugee Influxes: How to settle Refugees and Promote an Inclusive City? A Norwegian Perspective
Susanne Soholt, Norwegian Institute of Urban and Rural Research


Globalization and Localized Politics of Language: A Story of Haitian Creole English Dual Language Bilingual Program 
Mirna Lascano, National Coalition for Independent Scholars; Gordana Rabrenovic, Northeastern University


Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Kenora (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.08 Creating Safe Urban Spaces: Policy Interventions from Media to Municipal Government
"Street Not Thru": Street Closures, Neighborhood Geography, and Local Crime Rates in St. Louis, Missouri 
Christopher Prener, Saint Louis University; Joel Jennings, Saint Louis University; Cree Foeller, Saint Louis University


Dying While Walking: Interrogating Media Coverage of Pedestrian Deaths in 10 U.S. Cities 
Cara Robinson, Tennessee State University; Anthony Campbell, Tennessee State University


Turning-off Violent Networks 
Castillo Maria, Universidad del Valle, Cali Colombia; Boris Salazar, Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia


Socio-economic Stratification and Violent Crime: A Place-Based Approach to Neighborhood Crime Rates in Bogotá, Colombia 
Alejandro Gimenez-Santana, Rutgers University; Leslie W. Kennedy, Rutgers University; Grant Drawve, University of Arkansas; Joel M. Caplan, Rutgers University




Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Willow West (Mezzanine Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.09 Understanding the New “Spaces” of Poverty
Does Gentrification Trigger the Suburbanization of Poverty Among Blacks? An Empirical Study in Metropolitan Areas of the U.S. from 1980 to 2010 
Hui Jeong Ha, The Ohio State University; Bernadette Hanlon, The Ohio State University

An Analysis of Poverty Among Native-born and Foreign-born Populations in U.S. Cities: The Case of the City of Paterson, New Jersey 
Thomas Owusu, William Paterson University

A Place Left Behind? Declining Inner-Suburbs in the Toronto CMA and its Changing Typologies 
Steven Pham, University of Toronto

The Push for Innovation: How A Pro-Development Stance Influences Anti-Homeless Architecture and Ordinances 
Nicholas Belongie, University at Buffalo

The Working Class across the Urban-Rural Spectrum: Definitions, Diversity, and Spatial Distribution 
Colby King, Bridgewater State University


Speakers
avatar for Nicholas Belongie, University at Buffalo

Nicholas Belongie, University at Buffalo

Doctoral Student Department of Urban and Regional Planning and Graduate Research Assistant, Center for Urban Studies, University at Buffalo, State University of New York
CK

Colby King, Bridgewater State University

Bridgewater State University

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Dufferin (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.10  Place, Politics, Perception, and Preservation: Core Concepts for the Right to the City 
Mitigating Gentrification Through Landmarking: Historic Preservation in Central Brooklyn 
Aaron Passell, Barnard College


Historic Preservation: The Case to be Made for Mt. Olive Cemetery in Jackson, MS.
Heather Wilcox, Jackson State University


Rethinking the Entry in Practice: Perceptions from Tourist-Historic Barcelona
AnnaMarie Bliss, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Guerrilla Art and Historic Resources
Andrea Livi Smith, University of Mary Washington

Speakers
avatar for AnnaMarie Bliss

AnnaMarie Bliss

PhD Candidate, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Aaron Passell

Aaron Passell

Associate Director, Urban Studies, Barnard College
Historic preservation, gentrification, sustainability, urban development

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Roosevelt (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.12 Urban Innovation and Governance Transformation: A Comparative Perspective
Just about all city leaders claim that their city is innovative, but are these claims based on solid evidence? It is certainly the case that, in recent years, the practice of urban innovation has emerged as an important policy movement in cities around the world. This international panel, which will share perspectives on urban innovation in different countries and contexts, aims to provide a range of new insights on the nature of urban innovation and the prospects for using experimental approaches to transform city governance. In both developed and developing countries urban innovation policies are now being used to reform government practice and stimulate governance transformation. International awards have been created to encourage city-to-city learning and exchange. For instance, the Guangzhou International Award for Urban Innovation (GIAUI), presented biennially and co-sponsored by United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG), the World Association of the Major Metropolises (Metropolis) and the City of Guangzhou, recognizes the importance of innovation in improving social, economic and environmental sustainability in cities and regions. This panel will discuss two overlapping kinds of public innovation: 1) those that enhance governmental effectiveness (embracing the efficient and effective delivery of public services including, where appropriate, wise partnerships with a variety of stakeholders), and; 2) those that enhance the democratic quality of city governance (embracing measures designed to include voices that are often excluded, to increase citizen participation rates more generally, and to project the civic voice of local people beyond the boundaries of the city). The presentations in this panel will describe and analyse numerous efforts at urban innovation in different continents, including Asia, Europe, Central America and North America.


Moderator: Robin Hambleton, University of the West of England, Bristol


Urban Innovation, Governance and Development: Drawing Lessons from the Guangzhou International Award for Urban Innovation (GIAUI) 
Cathy Yang Liu, Georgia State University; Lin Ye, Sun-Yat-sen University


Urban Democratic Innovations: Comparing the Participatory Budget Agendas in Paris, Madrid and Mexico City 
Arturo Flores, Mexico Electoral Institute


US Cities in Challenging Times: Innovating While Constrained 
Christiana McFarland, National League of Cities (Presenter: Anita Yadavalli, National League of Cities)


The City Office Concept: Lesson Drawing from a Bold Urban Governance Innovation in Bristol, UK 
Robin Hambleton, University of the West of England, Bristol

Speakers
avatar for Robin Hambleton, University of the West of England, Bristol

Robin Hambleton, University of the West of England, Bristol

Emeritus Professor of City Leadership, University of the West of England, Bristol
I am Emeritus Professor of City Leadership at the University of the West of England, Bristol, UK and Director of Urban Answers, a company I founded in 2007 to provide assistance to city leaders on an international basis. Just now I am working quite closely with Marvin Rees, Mayor... Read More →

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Pine East (Mezzanine Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.13 Identity of Space: Migrants and Services in the Big City
Self-employed Migrants and their Entrepreneurial Spaces in Megacities: Evidence from Beijing’s Street Market 
Yulin Chen, Tsinghua University; Cathy Liu, Georgia State University

Informal Food Retail Networks in Mumbai, India 
Zeenat Kotval-K, Michigan State University

Traditional Food Markets in Urban China: Resilience and Vitality 
Shuru Zhong, Texas A&M University; Hongyang Di, Texas A&M University



Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Maple West (Mezzanine Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.14 The Regional Sum of Resilient Cities’ Parts: The Process and Effects of Urban Resilience Interventions within Broader Regions
The shocks communities face are, for the most part, shared with their neighbors. Yet, most efforts to mitigate or prepare for shocks are addressed community by community, or city by city. Regional interventions that account for both urban and rural areas, and the wealthier and poorer jurisdictions within, are few and far between. This panel applies the conference theme onto the fields of disaster management and resilience planning to: 1) identify contemporary municipal vs. regional strategies; 2) describe the political, financial, social, and geographic reasons for collaboration or autonomy through those strategies; and 3) assess the strategies’ implementation and outcomes to date.

The four papers in this panel will use U.S. and Canadian examples of disaster investments and resilience interventions within different governance contexts: core metropolises; multi-nodal regions; predominately rural regions; and regions with and without coordinating regional entities. Panelists also come from a variety of professional perspectives: Toronto’s Chief Resilience Officer; a scholar focused on a single city’s resilience planning (Norfolk, Virginia) under the 100 Resilient Cities program; a foundation officer focused on disaster response in the rural US Midwest; and a scholar of comparative governance and capacity-building for disaster and resilience interventions sponsored by the U.S. federal government and international philanthropy. Jointly, the papers provide nuanced insight into whether and how regions have approached their shared challenges through—and, alternately, despite or because of—their respective cities.


Moderator: Carlos Martin, Urban Institute

Leading by Example: The Case of Norfolk’s Resilience Strategy and Implementation 
Diane Levy, Urban Institute

When Your Neighbors are Just Like You: Rethinking Resilience Capacity in Rural Regions 
Erin Coryell, Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies

Sharing the Wealth: Assessing Regional Spillovers in Urban Resilience Programs 
Carlos Martin, Urban Institute


Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Willow Centre (Mezzanine Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.15 The Politics of Resilience Mechanisms
City-regions as Counter-powers for an Energy Transition? Looking at the Montreal City-regional Leadership Against Pipelines 
Sophie L. Van Neste, Institut National de Recherche Scientifique-Urbanisation Culture Société


Rural-urban Transitions at the Mega-city Fringe: Processes of Change and Future Scenarios for Mexico City's last Remaining Wetland 
Amy Lerner, Univerisdad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico; Patricia Perez Belmont, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico; Lakshmi Charli-Joseph, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico; Lakshmi Charli-Joseph, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico


Local Climate Based Energy Resilience Zones (ERZs) 
Steven Jige Quan, Seoul National University; Na Li, Seoul National University


The Contestation between U.S. Environmental Policy Values and Public Opinion 
J.R. "Jones" Estes, Portland State University

Speakers
JJ

J.R. Jones Estes

Director, Freshmen Year Experience in University Studies, Portland State University
interests: culture (esp. discourse & media) and environmental policy, political economy of public policy, and activist scholarship

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Maple East (Mezzanine Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.16 Cultural Industry and Production in the City

Art and Urban Design on Instagram 
Brettany Shannon, University of Southern California

Toronto Music Industry Advisory Council: Examining Arts Development Initiatives for Equitable Treatment of Divergent Community Stakeholders 
Sara Ross, Osgoode Hall Law School

The Cultural Rat Race: Local-Level Music and Arts Communities' Obstacles in Local Government Participation
Amelia Pridemore, Florida International University



Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Mackenzie (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.17 Finance-Led Capitalism, Housing and Urban Inequalities I: Logics, Institutions and Actors
Cities across the globe have been undergoing a massive transformation in the aftermath of the 2008 global financial crisis. While some cities have witnessed deepening poverty, foreclosures, and homelessness, others have experienced bubbling property markets, rampant gentrification, and rental housing crises. Some cities have witnessed both processes simultaneously, with effects on social, income, and wealth inequalities that vary along axes of difference such as race, gender, class, age, and citizenship. Undergirding such changes has been a reorganization of the global financial system, with new kinds of lenders and insidious innovations in new credit products. Simultaneously many countries have implemented national consumer protection strategies, financial literacy initiatives, and financially inclusive policy, which potentially serve their stated purposes of strengthening the financial resilience of individuals and households, but can also be conceptualized as deepening processes of state-led neoliberalism and financialization. Comparison between cities, countries and their associated policy initiatives will promote dialogue on the scalar components and effects of contemporary finance-led capitalism.


This first panel in the series seeks to understand the logics, actors and institutions of finance-led capitalism, including the role played by think-tanks, institutional investors, urban development institutions and processes, and urban policies related to lending and borrowing. It begins with a statement of theory related to the logics linking urban policy, urban institutions, and municipal processes. It then empirically interrogates how think tanks, planning regimes and state policies foster the environment for finance-led investment, and the institutions and actors that drive investment behaviour in selected cities.


Moderator: Andrew Kaufman, University of Toronto


The Financialization of the City
Manuel Aalbers, KU Leuven, Belgium


Symbolic Structures and Symbolic Power in the UK Housing Crisis: Think Tanks and Territorial Stigma
Tom Slater, University of Edinburgh


Shareholder as Client: Planning Practice in Publically-Traded Firms 
Orly Linovski, University of Manitoba


The Role of Institutional Investors for the Production of New Real Estate Commodity: A Case Study in West Loop, Chicago
Youngjun Kim, University of Illinois at Chicago


Circling Vultures: The Legal Geographies of Sovereign Debt Investors 
Andrew Kaufman, University of Toronto

Speakers
avatar for Manuel Aalbers

Manuel Aalbers

Professor of Human Geography, KU Leuven, the University of Leuven
Manuel B. Aalbers is full professor of Human Geography at KU Leuven/University of Leuven (Belgium) where he leads a research group on the intersection of real estate, finance and states, spearheaded by a grant from the European Research Council. He has also published on financialization... Read More →
YK

Youngjun Kim, University of Illinois at Chicago

PhD student, University of Illinois at Chicago
University of Illinois at Chicago

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Kent (2nd Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.18 Understanding, Managing and Reconfiguring the North American Suburb
The North American suburb has become increasingly complex from a social, economic and land-use perspective. But at the same time, features of the post-World-War-II North American suburb, such as its relatively low density, land-use specialization and near universal reliance on the automobile, have persisted to this day. These are aspects of the North American suburb that are targeted by smart growth and sustainable urbanization strategies attempting to foster a suburban pattern that is intensified, multifunctional and less automobile reliant. The session includes two presentations that examine the complexity of the contemporary North American suburb, and that describe the institutional governance mechanisms of suburbs and their impact on suburban urban form and transportation patterns. The three remaining presentations explore attempts to create walking- and public transit-conducive centres within the suburban realm. Such centres constitute the mainstay of strategies aiming to modify the land-use and journey dynamics of the North American suburb. The last three presentations describe the creation and transformation of centres, along with the conditions they must meet to be successful alternatives to prevailing suburban development trends. One of these presentations explores the transformation of a car-oriented edge city into a pedestrian- and transit-conducive suburban centre. Another presentation compares TOD strategies deployed in Canada’s two largest metropolitan regions and identifies conditions for TODs in these two regions to meet their modal share and land-use density and diversity objectives. And finally, the last presentation explores ways of creating walking- and public transit-hospitable environments in suburban centres, which will differentiate these centres from the rest of the suburban realm.


Moderator: Pierre Filion, University of Waterloo


Suburban Classifications and What They Mean 
Whitney Airgood-Obrycki, Harvard University; Bernadette Hanlon, The Ohio State University; Shannon Rieger, Harvard University

Checks and Balances in Planning Systems and Their Impact on Suburbanization: British Columbia, Ontario and Israel 
Eran Razin, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Changing the DNA of an Edge City: Tysons Struggles to Become Urban 
Igal Charney, University of Haifa

Between Transit-oriented Dispersion and Recentralisation: Addressing and Entrenching Car-Centric Dispersed Suburbanism in Greater Montreal and Toronto 
Olivier Roy-Baillargeon, University of Waterloo

Prioritizing Pedestrians to Increase Urban Growth Centre Activity: A Transformational Intervention, the Greater Golden Horseshoe, Canada 
Neluka Leanage, University of Waterloo; Pierre Filion, University of Waterloo


Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Linden (Mezzanine Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.20 Exploring Urban Theories
Rescaling State-Local Relations: Expenditure, Revenue and Authority 
Yunji Kim, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Mildred Warner, Cornell University


Mobility and Spatial Relations: Theorizing Collective Subjectivities through Travelling in Toronto 
Amardeep Kaur Amar, York University


Theories of Emotion and Encounter in the City: The Scale of the Body in Urban Planning 
Sarah Godfrey, University of Waterloo


Towards a Sociological Theory of Neighbor Disputes 
Hannu Ruonavaara, University of Turku (Finland); Risto Haverinen, University of Turku


Integrated Conceptual Framework For Youth Development in Mixed-Income Communities 
Miyoung Yoon, Case Western Reserve University; Mark Joseph, Case Western Reserve University


Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Pine West (Mezzanine Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.21 Cities in Canadian and American Political Development
The papers on this panel explore the relationship between urban politics and long-term political change in Canada and the United States. Inspired by American Political Development and related approaches, these papers seek to explain how urban changes both shape and reflect larger processes of political development at the national scale. The panelists will explore the urban dimensions of important political changes, ranging from party system shifts to the rise of the carceral state, in Canada and the United States.


Moderator: Joel Rast, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee 


Black Urban Citizenship and the Development of American Urban Orders
Kimberley Johnson, New York University


Forging the Urban Carceral State
Timothy Weaver, SUNY - Albany


Urban Issues and Provincial Policy Agendas in Canada
Jack Lucas, University of Calgary


Putting Politics in Its Place: Urbanization and the City in Canadian Political Development
Zack Taylor, Western University; Jack Lucas, University of Calgary

Speakers
avatar for Zack Taylor, University of Western Ontario

Zack Taylor, University of Western Ontario

Assistant Professor, University of Western Ontario
I study urban political economy, regional governance and planning, and the intersection of space and political behaviour. I dabble in planning history.

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Chestnut East (Mezzanine Floor)

10:50am

TH10.50.22 Post-Industrial Regional Resilience
Scholarship on regional governance has traditionally focused on large metropolitan and multi-metropolitan regions in the Rust Belt and Sun Belt. This panel uses studies grounded in Appalachia and the mid-Atlantic to provide insights about the small- and medium-size regions that remain important to the narrative of post-industrial regional resilience in America. The panel emphasizes the advantage of using a broadly neo-institutional lens in regional governance scholarship, with each paper exploring how outcomes vary in response to variation in rules, norms, or culture. It complements other proposed panels, including “How Are Regions Governed?” and “Current Debates and Practices in Regional Research,” and speaks to the special conference theme on urbanizing regions by exploring those which are de-urbanizing and re-urbanizing.


Moderator: Margaret Cowell, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University


Local Autonomy and Development Policy in Mid-Size Appalachian Regions 
Thomas Skuzinski, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Jay Rickabaugh, University of Pittsburgh


Small Cities: Regional Regeneration and Income Disparities 
James Bohland, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Emma Buchanan, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University


Trains, Brains, and Beer: Post-Industrial Change and Inequality in The Roanoke, Virginia Region 
Margaret Cowell, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Jon Bohland, Hollins University



Speakers
avatar for Margaret Cowell, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Margaret Cowell, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Margaret Cowell, PhD is an Assistant Professor of Urban Affairs and Planning at Virginia Tech. Her research focuses on economic development, urban economy, and public policy. Her research has been funded by the MacArthur Foundation and United States Economic Development Administr... Read More →

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 10:50am - 12:15pm
Cedar (Mezzanine Floor)

12:15pm

Lunch (on your own)
Thursday April 5, 2018 12:15pm - 1:30pm
TBA

1:29pm

Concurrent Sessions
Thursday April 5, 2018 1:29pm - 2:55pm
TBA

1:30pm

TH1.30.00 Tenure and Promotion
This panel brings together scholars at differing stages of their career to reflect on their experiences of gaining tenure and promotion. The tenure process presents multiple challenges and the participants will discuss strategies for success in navigating this process. They will discuss different aspects of the tenure process and reflect on the challenges of balancing teaching, research, and service obligations. They will also reflect on how they are creating space to forge a meaningful career. Topics to be discussed include preparing tenure documentation, research planning, research impact, service expectations, and navigating institutional politics.


Moderator: Yasminah Beebeejaun, University College London


University Service and Institutional Dynamics
Edith Barrett, University of Conneticut


Research Impact
Mark Joseph, Case Western Reserve University


Writing a Research Statement
Vladimir Kogan, The Ohio State University


External Review Matters, Too: The Inside-Outside Game of Tenure 
Michael Owens, Emory University


Reappointment, Tenure, Promotion: Yes You Can! 
Jocelyn Taliaferro, North Carolina State University


Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Dufferin (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.03 Community Land Trusts on the Rise: Roles and Relevancies of Community Land Trust Organizing in Toronto and its Urban Region
Attention towards community land trust organizing in Toronto and its urban region (the GTA) has greatly sparked over the past five years following a period of inactivity.  A revived interest in community land trusts results from increasing community-based mobilization in relation to stark increases in property values and housing prices, concerns over gentrification, and associated constraints on the provision and securement of affordable housing in Toronto and the GTA. Finding affordable rental housing is an everyday challenge for urban residents and the idea of affordable homeownership has become a pipe-dream for most. The realities of struggles over the daily cost of living in Toronto and its region create a ripe environment for community discussions not only about how to access affordable housing but, in light of intensification and development pressures, also in regard to how land can be protected and stewarded in ways that best reflect community interests. CLT organizations hold title to land in trust for community purposes and engage with local residents to identify uses for the land based on local needs; most often for affordable housing but increasingly for social enterprise activities and agricultural and green design practices (Bunce, 2016; Thompson, 2015), which underlines their potential as an innovative and progressive community-based development and organizing approach. This panel involves activists and supporters who are actively engaged with the recent burst of community land trust formation in Toronto and the GTA. Topics that will be addressed are: local rationales for CLT organizing, opportunities and challenges of community land trust organizing, and aspirations for community land trust development in the GTA and Canada, more broadly.


Moderator: Susannah Bunce, University of Toronto Scarborough


Parkdale Neighbourhood Land Trust Community Organizing and Planning 
Claire Heese-Boutin, Park dale Neighbourhood Land Trust


Kensington Market Community Land Trust Organizing and Planing 
Dominique Russell, Kensington Market Community Land Trust


Circle LandTrust Organizing and Planning 
Joy Connelly, Circle Community LandTrust


Community Land Trusts in Practice 
Kuni Kamizaki, University of Toronto


Hamilton Community Land Trust Organizing and Planning 
Allison Maxted, Hamilton Community Land Trust


Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
City Hall Room (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.01 Finance-Led Capitalism, Housing and Urban Inequalities II: Understanding Speculation, Value and Risk
Cities across the globe have been undergoing a massive transformation in the aftermath of the 2008 global financial crisis. While some cities have witnessed deepening poverty, foreclosures, and homelessness, others have experienced bubbling property markets, rampant gentrification, and rental housing crises. Some cities have witnessed both processes simultaneously, with effects on social, income, and wealth inequalities that vary along axes of difference such as race, gender, class, age, and citizenship. Undergirding such changes has been a reorganization of the global financial system, with new kinds of lenders and insidious innovations in new credit products. Simultaneously many countries have implemented national consumer protection strategies, financial literacy initiatives, and financially inclusive policy, which potentially serve their stated purposes of strengthening the financial resilience of individuals and households, but can also be conceptualized as deepening processes of state-led neoliberalism and “financialization”. Comparison between cities, countries and their associated policy initiatives will promote dialogue on the scalar components and effects of contemporary finance-led capitalism.

This second panel in the series examines how speculation and risk, and in turn the concept of “financialization” itself, might be theorized and measured with respect to the city, urban residents, and housing. It begins with a conceptual discussion of how the term “financialization” might be defined and measured. It then examines the concepts of financial literacy and financial inclusion, and interrogates how they might relate to financial value production. The last two papers in the session empirically examine how speculation and risk were and are embedded in the geography cities, via housing markets, mobilities, and infrastructure, among other things.

Moderator: Dylan Simone, University of Toronto

Financial Literacy, Risk, and Value Theory 
Dylan Simone, University of Toronto

A Geography of Speculative Finance: How the Production of Liquidity Reshapes Urbanization 
Kathe Newman, Rutgers University; Katie Nelson, Rutgers University; Elora Raymond, Clemson University

Real Estate Valuation and Influence on Spaces – Germany, Spain and Mexico in a Debate on Accounting Techniques 
Eugenia Winter, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Germany

Risky Neighbourhoods: The Multi-Scalar Geography of Vulnerability and Risk in the Canadian Urban Debtscape 
Alan Walks, University of Toronto

Real Estate Financialization and Changes in Space Production: The Relation Between Developers and State in the São Paulo Metropolis 
Beatriz Rufino, Universidade de Sao Paulo


Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Kent (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.02 Exploring Global Gentrification Processes
This session explores the diversity of gentrification processes and actors in a global context, with case studies from Chicago, Pongso no Tau and Hong Kong. Redevelopment and displacement is examined through a series of perspectives emphasizing a complex set of actors and upgrading processes, including artists and their communities, tourists, large-scale government involvement, and historic preservation activists and programs.


Moderator: Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University


Gentrification Processes in Chicago's Arts and Cultural Districts: The Shaping of Gentrification by the First Wave of Gentrifiers
Cristina Benton, Anderson Economic Group; Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University


On the Historical-Geographical Limits of Gentrification: Rent Gaps on Pongso no Tau?
Eric Clark, Lund University


Heritage-Fueled Gentrification and the Remaking of Chicago’s Northside Neighborhoods 
Ted Grevstad-Nordbrock, Iowa State University; Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University


The Landscape of Gentrification: Hong Kong, 1986–2006
Minting Ye, Pacific Union International; Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University; Guo Chen, Michigan State University


Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Churchill (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.04 The State, Housing and Community Regeneration

“Just the Reality”: Low-cost Housing Provision and the Changing Relationship Between the State, Property and Housing in Canada 
Sarah Cooper, University of Illinois at Chicago


A 'Hollow Hope' for Affordable Housing? The Efficacy of Judicial Intervention in Local Land Use Regulation 
Nicholas Marantz, University of California, Irvine; Huixin Zheng, University of California, Irvine


Managing the Patchwork: Strategic Approaches to Urban Regeneration With Fragmented Resources in Danish Municipalities 
Jesper Ole Jensen, Danish Building Research Institute

Speakers
avatar for Jesper Ole Jensen, Danish Building Research Institute

Jesper Ole Jensen, Danish Building Research Institute

Senior Researcher, Danish Building Research Institute
Urban regeneration Affordable housingShrinking cities

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Elgin (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.05 Negotiating Space and Power Upon Contested Grounds
Visionary urbanists have advocated an approach to creating inclusive and meaningful urban spaces that puts people’s diverse needs, values, cultural preferences, and social norms at the forefront. One of the development challenges during urban transformations is that tensions and conflicts over resources and spaces can arise among users whose priorities, preferences, and needs are at odds with each other. These tensions can increase within neighborhoods undergoing change due to social, cultural, economic, and political circumstances. With increasing public commitment to equity, human rights, social justice, and sustainability, it is imperative to be inclusive of voices typically under-represented in planning processes. Drawing from case studies of marginalized urban and suburban communities in different cities and regions, this panel examines how immigrants and community members have negotiated political power and claimed space and rights within host cities and societies. Situated in contested grounds within global, national, regional, and/or local contexts, the panel addresses critical urban development issues that intersect with the politics of power negotiation, and explores new approaches to creating inclusive and equitably shared spaces.

Moderator: Zhixi Cecilia Zhuang, Ryerson University

Building Inclusive Communities in Immigrant Suburbs: The Negotiation of Space, Place, Power, and Rights 
Zhixi Cecilia Zhuang, Ryerson University

Las Lomas: Appropriating Spaces 
Cecilia Giusti, Texas A&M University

Placing Resistance: Locating Activism in the City 
Kimberley Kinder, University of Michigan


Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Wentworth (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.06 Partnerships and Local Governance Networks in Immigrant Integration: Municipalities in Comparative Perspective (#1)
Immigrant integration has long been a salient issue for urban communities, municipal officials, and local non-governmental organizations that work with newcomer communities. This two-part panel brings together studies that investigate the local governance of immigrant integration in comparative municipal perspective, with a focus on governance mechanisms between different public entities as well as between public and private entities at the municipal level in the United States, Canada, and Europe. They ask: What are city officials doing to address immigrant integration issues? How does local context influence government narratives and programs of immigrant integration? How do cities participate in larger networks that seek to shape integration policies at the municipal level? How and where does immigrant integration fit in the work of municipal planners? How do local government officials work with non-governmental actors in developing and implementing integration policies and practices? How does the immigrant integration work of government officials in small, more remote municipalities compare with that of officials in big, urban immigrant destinations? The papers in this two-part panel address these important questions using original quantitative and qualitative data, and they draw on literatures and theoretical perspectives in political science, public policy, urban planning, sociology, and anthropology.




Moderator: Els de Graauw, Baruch College 




When Immigrants Collaborate with City Administrations: Relational Dynamics Between Immigrants and Integration Officials in Local Integration Councils 
Maria Schiller, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity




Local Context and Institutional Narratives and Programs of Immigrant Integration: The Case of City Immigrant Affairs Offices in the United States 
Els de Graauw, Baruch College




Municipal Planning and Local Immigrant Immigration: An Agenda for Welcoming Cities 
Stacy Harwood, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign




Recognition and Institutional Memory in the Analysis of Public Action in Intercultural Relations: The Case of Montréal 
Marta Massana, University of Montreal


Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Huron (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.07 Efficiency, Efficacy and Accessibility of Service Providing Programs
Do Recreation Centers Matter?: Youth Perspectives on a Municipal Initiative in Atlanta, Georgia
Cameron Herman, Michigan State University 


NGOs and Civic Engagement in Cape Town: Trends and Challenges of Engaging People in Local Community Development Programs and Initiatives
Nakeefa Garay, Rutgers University 


Access to Emergency Food Providers: Method and Application 
Brian Mikelbank, Cleveland State University 


The Not So Common Life: Lea Demarest Taylor and the Chicago Commons Settlement House
Alicia Schatteman, Northern Illinois University


Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Willow West (Mezzanine Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.08 There's Nothing as Practical as a Good Theory: Rethinking Practice in Building Community Capital
Neighborhood Effects of Social Capital: A Reconceptualization of Putnam and Bourdieu’s Conceptions of Social Capital
Jinhee Yun, Cleveland State University 


Does Neighborhood-Level Social Capital Predict Resident Involvement in Coproduction Activities? 
Gary Anderson, University of North Carolina at Pembroke 


Reconstituting the Urban Commons: Democracy, Social Capital and Public Space in the 21st Century 
David Brain, New College of Florida 


Opportunities and Challenges of Community Wealth Building as a Poverty Alleviation Strategy: The Case of Richmond Virginia
Elsie Harper-Anderson, Virginia Commonwealth University; Risha Berry, Virginia Commonwealth University


Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Simcoe (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.09 Urban Planning and Redevelopment History 1

The Life, Death, and Legacy of the Toronto Bureau of Municipal Research, 1914-1983 
Gabriel Eidelman, University of Toronto


Planning From a Longue Durée Historical Perspective: Lessons From Downtown Toronto Development, 1945-2015 
Pierre Filion, University of Waterloo


Disputing Collective Memory: Urban Renewal Programs Today 
William Holt, Birmingham-Southern College



Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Mackenzie (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.10 A Feminist Urban Theory for Our Time: Rethinking Social Reproduction, the Urban and its Constitutive Outside

In this panel we explore how feminist approaches to the urban, long focused on social reproduction, in the current juncture, need to engage with the social reproduction of the planet itself. Social reproduction is at work in many sites and scales beyond the urban—including bodily, territorial, land-based, regional, and ecological, to name but a few. Proceeding from a focus on social justice, panelists will discuss feminist approaches to social reproduction from a variety of socio-spatial ontologies and from a range of orientations—including but not limited to anti-racist, anti-colonial, trans, eco-justice and indigenous perspectives—in order to understand how social reproduction is configuring both the urban and its constitutive outside.


Moderator: Elsa Koleth, York University


A Feminist Urban Theory for our Time: Rethinking Social Reproduction, the Urban and its Constitutive Outside 
Linda Peake, York University; Darren Patrick, York University ; Rajyashree N. Reddy, University of Toronto ; Susan Ruddick, University of Toronto; Gökbörü Tanyildiz, York University


Community and Social Reproduction: Rethinking the Local Turn in Leftist Politics in Korea through the Case of the Community Childcare Co-op Movement 
Laam Hae, York University


Infrastructures of Donor Breast Milk: Urbanization, Anticolonialism, and Distributed Reproduction in Brazil 
Carolyn Prouse, University of British Columbia




Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Kenora (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.11 Globalization and Its Discontents: Inequality and Vulnerability
Harnessing the Power of Research to Impact Conditions of Chronic and Concentrated Joblessness in the Aftermath of Global Economic Restructuring 
Teresa Córdova, University of Illinois at Chicago


Framing Morocco’s City-Building Agenda: Policy Mobilization as Legitimation for the New City Imaginary 
Laurence Côté-Roy, McGill University


Urban Vulnerability in the Capital of the Connected World: The New York Ebola Panic 
Yeong-Hyun Kim, Ohio University

Speakers
TC

Teresa Cordova

Director, University of Illinois at Chicago/Great Cities Institute

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Roosevelt (2nd Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.12 Decentralization, Intergovernmental Competition and Cooperation Experiments in China and India
Decentralization and Improvements in Basic Service Delivery in Indian Cities 
Nidhi Subramanyam, Cornell University


Inter-jurisdictional Competition and Redistributive Expenditure across Chinese County-level Governments
Huiping Li, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics; Ping Zhang, Fudan University; Chunrong Zheng, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics 


Inter-City Competition and Local Government Debts in China: A Spatial Econometric Analysis
Shaoming Cheng, Florida International University; Hai Guo, Florida International University; Richard Feiock, Florida State University


Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Pine West (Mezzanine Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.13 Understanding Resilience in the Face of Extreme Events
Advocacy and Collaborative Planning in Post-Disaster Resettlement: A Case of Lapindo Mudflow Disaster in Indonesia 
Asrizal Luthfi, University of Hawai'i

The Evacuation Camp as a Paradoxical Space for Women 
Christine Gibb, University of Toronto

Urban Extreme Climate Impacts Recovery and Resiliency: The “Whole community” Approach 
Juia Nevarez, Kean University

Historiography of Insurgent Planning in Informal Settlements. Post-disaster Reconstruction in the Midst of War in Medellin-Colombia 
Diana Benjumea, University of Nottingham; Peter Rutherford, University of Nottingham; John Chilton, University of Nottingham

Does Experience of Climate-induced Events Shape Perceived Images of Climate Change? Evidence From Lagos, Nigeria 
Vincent Kuuire, University of Toronto Mississauga; Idowu Ajibade, Portland State University; Gordon McBean, Western University; Gordon McBean, Western University

Speakers
avatar for Julia Nevarez

Julia Nevarez

Sociology Coordinator, Kean University
Dr. Julia Nevarez’s research interests focus on urban issues, urban development, public space and technoculture. Her interdisciplinary approach to urban living is evident in her written work with chapters in books about public space and globalization in Central Park; large video... Read More →

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Maple East (Mezzanine Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.14 Air Pollution in Asia
Does the Environmental Protection Interview Really Matter to Air Pollution Control? 
Jiannan Wu, Shanghai Jiao Tong University; Jing Wen, Shanghai Jiao Tong University; Fanrong Meng, Xi'an Jiaotong University; Fanrong Meng, Xi'an Jiaotong University

Understanding the Socioeconomic Impact of Fine Particulate Matter Using Text Data Mining Techniques 
Yunwon Choi, Seoul National University; Heeyeun Yoon, Seoul National University

What Cause Air Pollution: An Empirical study of PM2.5 Concentrations Across 293 Chinese Cities 
Jiannan Wu, Shanghai Jiao Tong University; Zhao Qin, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Principles of Urban Congestion and Traffic Emissions Based on Didi Massive Car-hailing Data, Case Study in Shanghai 
Daniel(Jian) Sun, Shanghai Jiao Tong University; Kaisheng Zhang, Shanghai Jiao Tong University; Suwan Shen, University of Hawaii, Manoa


Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Chestnut West (Mezzanine Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.15 Urban Images, Urban Styles, Urban Readings
How do cultural traditions shape the concrete spaces of cities? How are cities imagined by the communities that gather together to inhabit them, by the artists that represent them, by architects and planners that design them? Focusing on the modern design elements of distinct North American cities, this panel investigates the intertwined political, economic and aesthetic image-making processes of modern cities, considering how cities are mythically “stylized” and marketed through the complex mediation of cultural, literary, cinematic, and architectural traditions.


Moderator: Susan Ingram, York University


Gentrification by Adobe: Design Traditions of Santa Fe's Urban Imaginary 
Markus Reisenleitner, York University

Stan Douglas’s Virtual Redesigning of Vancouver Circa 1948 
Susan Ingram, York University

Creative Spaces, Creative Design: Toronto Libraries 
Natallia Barykina, University of Toronto 

City-Writing: Community and Pursuit in Post-war American Crime Fiction
Arthur Redding, York University


Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Maple West (Mezzanine Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.16 Urbanizing Regions in the Global South: A Comparative Perspective
This proposed panel features new work that explores alternative paths of theorizing urban processes. Since around 2008, the field of global urban studies has seen a gradual paradigm shift. Neoliberalism has been increasingly called into question for its lack of explanatory power for processes of urban restructuring that do not conform to the model of post-Fordism and deindustrialization as seen in West Europe and North America since the 1970s. The critique is especially launched by postcolonial scholars, who value local particularities and question both economism and over-determinacy in conventional political economy analyses. However, many scholars working on cities in the global South find an uncomfortable theoretical fit with both neoliberalism and its postcolonial critiques. From a comparative perspective, the five papers explore new conceptual frameworks by examining housing, land, regional planning, and environmental issues in urbanizing regions in the global South.


Moderator: Xuefei Ren, Michigan State University 


Towards Inclusive Cities: Strategies and Outcomes of Community Organizations Across Latin America and Africa
Maureen Donaghy, Rutgers University, Camden; Jeffrey Paller, University of San Francisco


Agrarian Urbanisms: Locating Urbanisms Beyond the City 
Shubhra Guruani, York University


“Land Grabbing” in China and India: The Political Economy of Land Acquisition in an Autocracy and a Multi-Party Democracy
Lynette Ong, University of Toronto


Up in the Air: Clean Air Campaigns in Beijing and Delhi
Xuefei Ren, Michigan State University


The Greater Bay Area in China: A New Paradigm or Old Wine?
Lin Ye, Sun Yat-Sen University


Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Willow East (Mezzanine Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.17 Studying Urban Government at Multiple Scales
Planning for Natural Gas Pipelines in Ohio: Governance and Other Complexities 
Jessica Wilson, The Ohio State University; Maria Conroy, The Ohio State University


Whose Plan for the Neighborhood? The Impact of Philanthropic Policy Making on Urban Community Nonprofits in Implementing Detroit Future City 
Janice Bockmeyer, City University of New York - John Jay College


Condominium Futures: Homeownership, Compromise and Planning Centres 
Steven Webber, Ryerson University; Brian Webb, Cardiff University


Governing the Urban Public Realm: Planning and Politics of Public Space in Bogota, Colombia Between 1990 and 2017 
Natalia Villamizar-Duarte, University of Illinois at Chicago

Speakers
Moderator
avatar for Janice Bockmeyer

Janice Bockmeyer

Associate Professor, City University of New York - John Jay College
urban governance, planning and politics, community development, political participation, community nonprofit organizations

Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Pine East (Mezzanine Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.18 Rust and Shine: Post-Industrial Redevelopment and the Growth Imperative
Utilizing case studies from a variety of metropolitan and regional contexts, this panel examines the causes and consequences of popular growth strategies as deployed in the post-industrial landscape. Labeled part of the “Rust Belt” in the U.S. and saddled with its narrative of decline, these communities utilize a variety of techniques to adapt to the service-oriented urban political economy. The authors consider how cultural forms of development practice, heritage tourism or investment inspired by the theories of Richard Florida for example, impact local economies and alter the physical and social capital of communities. Papers, covering an urban scope from large to small, highlight the remarkable sameness of growth strategies regardless of community size.


Moderator: Alex Sayf Cummings, Georgia State University 


The Outsiders: The Limits of Growth Strategies for Small Cities in Rural Regions
Brian Tochterman, Northland College


The Promise – and Peril – of Creative Placemaking: Collaboration and Contestation in Post-Industrial Milwaukee 
Michael Carriere, Milwaukee School of Engineering


When the Coal Mines Close: Memory and Representation Outside of Pittsburgh and Hauts-de-France 
David Schalliol, St. Olaf College

Speakers
avatar for David Schalliol, St. Olaf College

David Schalliol, St. Olaf College

Associate Professor
David Schalliol is an associate professor of sociology at St. Olaf College who explores the transformation of urban centers through mixed-methodology projects. His writing and photographs have appeared in such publications as MAS Context, the New York Times, and Social Science Research... Read More →

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Willow Centre (Mezzanine Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.20 Who Participates? Reshaping the Image of the Voter
Moderator: Ronald Vogel, Ryerson University


What Can We Learn From a Participatory Design Process Involving Seniors? A Case Study Around Urban Pedestrian Issues 
Amélie-Myriam Plante, Université de Montréal; Sébastien Lord, Université de Montréal; Marie-Soleil Cloutier, Centre Urbanisation Culture Societé Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS)


Is Informal Participation the Alternative ? - A Case Study of Mexico Bike Activism 
Catherine Bilodeau, Université Laval; Émilie Houde-Tremblay, Université Laval; Geneviève Cloutier, Université Laval


Urban Politics of Immigrants in the Netherlands in Times of ‘Crisis’ 
Floris Vermeulen, University of Amsterdam; Maria Kranendonk, University of Amsterdam


Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Linden (Mezzanine Floor)

1:30pm

TH1.30.21 What is “The Region” in City-Region Research? Current Themes and Debates
The region provides a significant and enduring scale for urban analysis and public policy-making. Numerous definitions of the region exist, many intending to define or understand the generative power of metropolitan spaces that exceed the political boundaries of traditional central cities. Contemporary research on regions challenges many presumptions about how inter- and intra-regional processes work, and the extent to which metropolitan regions should be considered benign or malign spaces for the citizens that live there. This panel includes contributions that express current debates and practices that are shaping regional research across geographic and disciplinary boundaries. The four papers share a critical perspective on how regions are constructed, noting the way that regions are shaped by particular stakeholders for specific purposes. Each paper provides a distinct account about how planning and politics is being shaped in contemporary city-regions. By bringing together approaches to comprehending the enduring significance of the metropolitan region as both a scale and subject of research, the panel provides a forum for urbanists working on topics including regional governance, planning and economic development, and social equity.


Moderator: Michael Glass, University of Pittsburgh 


Territorial Consciousness and Regional Imaginaries: How Do Growth Coalitions Think the Region? 
David Wachsmuth, McGill University


Seeing Beyond the State: The Politics of Business-Oriented Regionalism
John Harrison, Loughborough University


Which Regions? New Data in the Quest to Define Urban Regions
Jen Nelles, City University of New York


Navigating the Regionalism-Public Choice Divide in Regional Studies 
Michael Glass, University of Pittsburgh


Thursday April 5, 2018 1:30pm - 2:55pm
Cedar (Mezzanine Floor)

2:55pm

3:09pm

Concurrent Sessions
Thursday April 5, 2018 3:09pm - 4:35pm
TBA

3:10pm

TH3.10.00 Publishing in Urban Journals
This colloquy is a Journal of Urban Affairs sponsored discussion of publishing in urban journals. It will be particularly helpful for scholars relatively new to publishing and will include the editors of several urban journals. Scholar development programs will also be discussed. The participants will provide observations about publishing best practices and significant time will be devoted to audience-driven questions.


Moderator: Laura Reese, Michigan State University


Publishing in JUA 
Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University

Publishing in UAR 
Jered Carrr, University of Illinois Chicago

Publishing in UAR 
Annette Steinacker, Loyola University Chicago

Publishing in Housing, Theory and Society
Hannu Ruonavaara, University of Turku, Finland

Publishing in International Urban Journals 
Eric Clark, Lund University

Scholar Development Programs 
Laura Reese, Michigan State University

Speakers
JC

Jered Carr

University of Illinois at Chicago
avatar for Hannu Ruonavaara

Hannu Ruonavaara

Professor of Sociology, University of Turku, Finland
Theory and housing studies; neighbour relations; housing policy; comparative historical analysis. I am also the editor of Housing, Theory and Society, the only housing studies journal focusing on theory, published by Taylor & Francis.
IV

Igor Vojnovic

Michigan State University

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Dufferin (2nd Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.03 How Fair is Fair Housing? Integration and the Pursuit of Racial Justice in 21st Century America
This panel will engage the new book by Edward Goetz, “The One-Way Street of Integration: Fair Housing and the Pursuit of Racial Justice in American Cities,” just published by Cornell University Press. Commentators will discuss the future of American housing policy and its relationship to, and impact on, our current struggles for racial justice in the United States. Professor Goetz will then respond to the comments.

Moderator: David Imbroscio, University of Louisville

Comment 
Casey Dawkins, University of Maryland

Comment 
Akira Drake Rodriguez, University of Pennsylvania

Comment
David Imbroscio, University of Louisville

Response to Comments 
Edward Goetz, University of Minnesota


Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
City Hall Room (2nd Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.15 Scenescapes: How Qualities of Place Shape Social Life
This session will critically engage with issues raised by Scenescapes: How Qualities of Place Shape Social Life (University of Chicago Press), by Daniel Silver and Terry Nichols Clark. Core topics include: the importance of the concept of scene for general urban theory; the factors and dimensions that define the qualities of a local scene; the impact of local scenes on economic growth, residential patterns, and politics; how scenes reproduce but also may bridge social divisions; and policy implications. Speakers will bring to bear diverse intellectual backgrounds on these topics from human ecology, economic geography, cultural policy, and social geography. 


Moderator: Daniel Silver, University of Toronto


Comments on Scenescapes
Sida Liu, University of Toronto


Comments on Scenescapes
Alison Bain, York University


Comments on Scenescapes 
Terry Nicholson, City of Toronto (formerly)


Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Churchill (2nd Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.01 Finance-Led Capitalism, Housing and Urban Inequalities III: The State, Real Estate, and the Transformation of the City
Cities across the globe have been undergoing a massive transformation in the aftermath of the 2008 global financial crisis. While some cities have witnessed deepening poverty, foreclosures, and homelessness, others have experienced bubbling property markets, rampant gentrification, and rental housing crises. Some cities have witnessed both processes simultaneously, with effects on social, income, and wealth inequalities that vary along axes of difference such as race, gender, class, age, and citizenship. Undergirding such changes has been a reorganization of the global financial system, with new kinds of lenders and insidious innovations in new credit products. Simultaneously many countries have implemented national consumer protection strategies, financial literacy initiatives, and financially inclusive policy, which potentially serve their stated purposes of strengthening the financial resilience of individuals and households, but can also be conceptualized as deepening processes of state-led neoliberalism and financialization. Comparison between cities, countries and their associated policy initiatives will promote dialogue on the scalar components and effects of contemporary finance-led capitalism.
This third panel in the series examines the role played by the state on the one hand, and the infusion of foreign and domestic capital on the other, in transforming the city, particularly through real estate development, housing markets, and gentrification. This session examines these dynamics in four key case-study cities: Antwerp (Belgium), Cairo (Egypt), Mumbai (India), and Detroit (USA).
Moderator: Lama Tawakkol, Queen's University 


Entrepreneurial Governance and Land Assetisation in Antwerp 
Callum Ward, KU Leuven, Belgium


Reconfiguring Homes as Investment in Financial Capitalism? The Case of Egyptian Housing Markets 
Lama Tawakkol, Queen's University


Unholy Compact: The Nexus of Domestic and Foreign Capital in the New Housing Inequalities in Mumbai 
Bharat Punjabi, University of Guelph


Gentrification and Socio-Spatial Inequality in Detroit: The Role of Public Subsidies 
Julie Mah, University of Toronto


Hordes with Cash: Real Estate Funding Platforms and the Legal-Regulatory Constitution of the Crowd 
Philip Ashton, University of Illinois at Chicago; Rachel Weber, University of Illinois at Chicago

Speakers
Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Kent (2nd Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.02 Strategies for Housing Affordability in Global Cities
This panel will address the urban governance challenge of affordable housing provision in high-demand globalised cities. Drawing examples from Barcelona, Amsterdam, London, New York City and Toronto, speakers will examine how, in these increasingly financialised local housing markets, urban policies are enlisting actors across sectors to increase affordability. Attention is given not only to low income housing, but also to ‘affordable’ options for middle income households. While rental housing assistance in Western welfare states tends to be characterised in terms of residualised systems providing safety-nets for the disadvantaged, patterns of development in these global urban cultural and financial centres diverge from this model. State agencies have been redeployed to encourage new and more marketised forms of affordable housing through the not-for-profit and commercial sectors, with strong reliance on private finance. Target recipients are often low to middle-income working households, with assistance framed in terms of opportunity, rather than a reliable social safety net. The panel discussion will reflect critically on these developments giving attention both to the politics of these new forms of provision, and to their implications for housing providers, tenants, and groups whose needs are increasingly overlooked.


Moderator: Jeroen Van der Veer, Amsterdam Federation of Housing Associations 


Financializing Affordable Housing Provision? Not-for-Profits and Institutional Investment in London and New York City 
Anita Blessing, University of Birmingham; Nicky Morrison, University of Cambridge


Affordable Housing Strategies in Amsterdam 
Jeroen Van der Veer, Amsterdam Federation of Housing Associations; Anita Blessing, University of Birmingham


Social Housing in Barcelona After 2007: Continuity or Disruption? 
Montserrat Pareja-Eastaway, University of Barcelona


Affordable Rental Policy in Toronto, 1997-2017
Greg Suttor, Wellesley Institute, Toronto 


Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Wentworth (2nd Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.04 Communities for All, Across the Lifecourse
Mobility Among Seniors in Low-Density Settings: A Study in Three Medium-Sized Cities in Quebec, Canada 
Paula Negron, University of Montreal; Sebastien Lord, University of Montreal


Gender, Age and Mobility: Variations and Challenges in the Daily Mobility of Women of Elderly Women in Puebla, Mexico 
Karine Picard, Université de Montréal; Paula Negron-Poblete, Université de Montréal


Housing Tenure Transition of Baby Boomers: Income, Price, and Life Cycle Factors 
Jinyhup Kim, University of Maryland, College Park


Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Elgin (2nd Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.05 Land, Property, and Land Conflicts: The Intersection of Urban and Rural
Contestations over land and property often connect the urban and the rural. Conflicts arise over the use of land and conversion of land uses in exurban and rural areas. These may be framed in terms of social justice, sustainability, farmland protection, nature conservation, resource extraction, excess soil, siting of urban infrastructure, protection of water, indigenous land claims, and urban development. Conflicts also arise when new forms of investment and financialization of land challenge existing uses of, and relationships with, land. Investments in and transformation of land by property developers continue to be contested, especially by opponents to urban sprawl, proponents for near urban agriculture, social justice advocates, and indigenous communities. Alternative conceptions of land beyond its commodity form underpin popular resistance by grassroots and indigenous movements, and by coalitions that bring together urban and rural interests in political and strategic engagement with the state and market actors. Competing discursive strategies vie to shape the form and content of regulatory policies that seek to address contested claims to land and property. The politics of land shape new institutional arrangements and state responses.


This panel highlights the relationships among property, land, land use and land conflicts in urban regions. Panelist are encouraged to examine these issues using a range of theoretical approaches, including political ecology, political economy, institutionalism, socio-legal studies, indigenous studies, feminist theory, and critical planning theory.


Moderator: Donald Leffers, Carleton University


Land-Based Conflicts: Contested Meanings of Land and Changes in Uses of Land
Gerda Wekerle, York University


The Ground Beneath Us: Aggregate Mineral Extraction, The Duty to Consult, and Indigenous Environmental Governance
Estair Van Wagner, York University


Confronting Rural-Urban Land Use Conflict with Environmental Stewardship: The Case of Milpa Alta Ecological Farming in Mexico City
Tania Hernandez-Cervantes, York University


Meanings of Land and Property in Land Use Planning and Development: Urban Developers and Land Use Conflict in the Toronto Region
Donald Leffers, Carleton University


Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Cedar (Mezzanine Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.06 Planning for the Millennial City
This panel will address the impacts that Millennials are having on U.S. cities. The Millennial generation (born 1981 to 1997) is typically viewed as networked, flexibly employed, and centered in urban downtowns near lively cafes and abundant public transit. Yet, Millennials also are highly diverse and face pressing challenges of housing affordability and socioeconomic mobility. Panelists will discuss current demographic, housing, economic, and transportation trends related to the Millennial generation and their implications for urban planning and policymaking.


Moderator: Deirdre Pfeiffer, Arizona State University


Cementing Millennials Downtown: Expressions and Impacts 
Deirdre Pfeiffer, Arizona State University; Genevieve Pearthree, Arizona State University; Meagan Ehlenz, Arizona State University


Young Adults (Still) Living at Home: Exploring the Relationship Between Young Adults’ Propensity to Reside with Their Parents and Employment Precarity 
Markus Moos, University of Waterloo; Ashley Salvador, University of Waterloo


Making Space for the Millennial Economy: Planning for New Forms of Urban Production
Tara Vinodrai, University of Waterloo; Nichola Lowe, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Elites and Exiles: Millennials in a Crowded Housing Market
Sarah Mawhorter, University of California Berkeley

Speakers
avatar for Tara Vinodrai, University of Waterloo

Tara Vinodrai, University of Waterloo

Associate Professor in the School of Environment, University of Waterloo
Tara Vinodrai is an Associate Professor in the School of Environment, Enterprise and Development (SEED) and the Department of Geography and Environmental Management at the University of Waterloo, where she is also Director of the Local Economic Development graduate program. Her research... Read More →

Moderator
avatar for Deirdre Pfeiffer, Arizona State University

Deirdre Pfeiffer, Arizona State University

Deirdre Pfeiffer is an Associate Professor in the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning at Arizona State University and a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners. Dr. Pfeiffer is a housing planning scholar, with expertise on housing as a cause and effect... Read More →

Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Linden (Mezzanine Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.07 Understanding Health and Mobility in Urban Contexts
Neighborhood Characteristics, Transportation Habits, and Obesity: A Case Study of Detroit 
Rayman Mohamed, Wayne State University 

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Cycling Interventions in the Toronto Area 
Beth Savan, University of Toronto; Michelle Kearns, Toronto Cycling Think and Do Tank, University of Toronto 

Spatial Mismatch, Commuting and Health of the Suburban Residents in Transitional Chinese Cities: Evidences from Beijing 
ZHANG Yan, The Institute of Beijing Studies, Beijing Union University; LIU Zhilin, School of Public Policy and Management of Tsinghua University; CHAI Yanwei, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University; FU Tingting, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University


Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Kenora (2nd Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.08 Urban Innovation and Inclusion
As “innovation” becomes an increasingly prominent buzzword in U.S. urban and regional policy, the authors on this panel offer a range of perspectives on the equity implications of the pursuit of innovation and on the role of public policy in encouraging social inclusion in conjunction with innovation strategies. Jennifer Clark and Thomas Lodato of the Georgia Institute of Technology analyze the production of open government data in Atlanta, revealing the human work and skill required to create and distribute a technology that generally associated with machines. Dillon Mahmoudi of University of Maryland, Baltimore Count explores the bifurcated – and gendered – U.S. labor market for software production and considers the role of labor intermediaries in mitigating inequalities. Laura Wolf-Powers of Hunter College CUNY examines a community coalition’s effort to position unemployed and underemployed residents to gain workforce training opportunities and access to jobs in the context of innovation-branded local development in Philadelphia. Allison Forbes, Nichola Lowe and Noreen McDonald of the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill look examine the economics and politics of modern-day apprenticeship. And Nichola Lowe of the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and Tara Vinodrai of the University of Waterloo present the case of the Carolina Textile District, illustrating how growing urban policy interest in the maker movement, with its focus on local product design and innovation, can also become a catalyst for revitalizing non-metro manufacturing communities and legacy industries.


Moderator: Nichola Lowe, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill


The Work of Smart Cities: Skill and Sociotechnical Change in the Smart City
Jennifer Clark, Georgia Institute of Technology; Thomas Lodato, Georgia Institute of Technology


Modes of Production and Gender-based Wage Outcomes in Three Software Cities 
Dillon Mahmoudi, University of Maryland, Baltimore County


Unpacking Inclusive Innovation in West Philadelphia’s University City
Laura Wolf-Powers, Hunter College


Apprenticeship 2.0: Maintaining Job Quality through Workforce Intermediation
Allison Forbes, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill; Nichola Lowe, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill; Noreen McDonald, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill


Institutionalizing the Maker-Manufacturing Nexus: Implications for Spatial Equity and Generational Integration
Nichola Lowe, University North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Tara Vinodrai, University of Waterloo


Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Simcoe (2nd Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.10 Urban Planning and Redevelopment History 2
Green Belt Planning: Learning from History to untangle their Potential to shape Sustainable Urban and Regional Futures
Rebeca Dios-Lema, University College London - Technical University of Madrid


Streetcars Photographers and the Changing Geography of Toronto 
Brian Doucet, University of Waterloo; Michael Doucet, Ryerson University


Understanding the Institutionalization of Urban Planning in Chicago Via its Changing Relationship With Housing, 1909-1941
Kari Smith, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee


Native Whites’ Prejudice Toward Southern, Central, and Eastern European Immigrants as a Source of Political Fragmentation in 5 Metropolitan Regions 
David Elesh, Temple University


Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Mackenzie (2nd Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.11 Schools and Urban/Suburban Changes
New Suburbanizaiton: The Effects of Deconsolidated School Districts 
Anne Zobell, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Adam Eckerd, Indiana University , Power


Public Schools and Political Attitudes in Post-Katrina New Orleans 
Domingo Morel, Rutgers University - Newark; Sally Nuamah, Princeton University


Development, Urban Integration, and Education of Migrant Children in China 
Christine Wen, Cornell University


The Effects of School Closure on Neighborhoods in Lansing, MI 
Louise Jezierski, Michigan State University; Tanner Delpier, Michigan State University


Speakers
avatar for Louise Jezierski, Michigan State University

Louise Jezierski, Michigan State University

Michigan State University
I have been a professor at Michigan State since 1997.My MA and PhD are in Sociology from UC Berkeley, and my BA is from Boston University in Sociology and Geography.

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Huron (2nd Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.13 Ongoing and Future Challenges on Urban Spaces in Post-Growth Japan
Japan presents an interesting opportunity to observe the challenges influencing urban environments in post-industrial societies. Apart from commercialization and commodification of public spaces and large-scale redevelopment projects redefining neighborhoods, Japan is also experiencing rapidly advancing depopulation, triggered by low-birth rates and an aging population. These phenomena are transforming its cities and urban spaces which will need to readapt to the new reality while sustaining their social qualities. The papers in this panel aim to discuss the ways through which urban spaces are reacting to Japan’s post-growth contemporary socioeconomic reality. Taking different approaches and case studies, the panelists will explore this issue at multiple scales: from the commodification of place identity of urban areas or the metamorphosis of public space in large redevelopment projects to the role of religious facilities in changing neighborhoods or the near disappearance of a town. In making this analysis, our panelists want to critically evaluate current mechanisms and open a dialogue to explore possible future ways of action.


Moderator: Zdenka Havlova, University of Tokyo 


Place Identity and Ongoing Railway-Led Urban Development in Tokyo: Towards a Commodified Identity?
Marco Reggiani, University of Tokyo


Questioning Publicness: Expulsion, Direction, and Monitoring in Multi-Layered Public Spaces in Tokyo 
Zdenka Havlova, University of Tokyo


The Potential for Networked Public Space in Tokyo's Four Religious Sites
Kaon Ko, Tokyo University of Science


The Slow Death of Yubari City: Social Responses to the Disappearance of a Japanese Mining City 
Fernando Ortiz-Moya, University of Nottingham Ningbo China

Speakers
avatar for Fernando Ortiz-Moya, University of Nottingham Ningbo China

Fernando Ortiz-Moya, University of Nottingham Ningbo China

Assistant Professor in Architecture and the Built Environment, The University of Nottingham Ningbo China
Fernando Ortiz-Moya is an Assistant Professor in Architecture and Built Environment at the University of Nottingham, Ningbo China. His teaching interests revolve around architectural and urban design and the different ways our physical environment can promote social integration... Read More →

Moderator

Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Roosevelt (2nd Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.14 Innovative Urban Climate Governance 
Making Shrinking Cities Green? Producing Ecosystem Services on Vacant Land in the Netherlands, Germany and the United States 
Mattijs van Maasakkers, Ohio State University


Public Policies and Sustainable Districts: From an Environmental Focus to a Wider One 
Richard Morin, Université du Québec à Montréal; Anne Latendresse, Université du Québec à Montréal; Nicolas Lozier, Université du Québec à Montréal


The Other Side of Urban Environmental Justice: Absolute Maximum Carbon Emissions for Large Houses 
Christina Bollo, University of Illinois


Experimenting, Reflecting, and Learning to Embed and Implement Sustainability in the Built Environment 
Andreanne Doyon, RMIT University; Susie Moloney, RMIT University; Joe Hurley, RMIT University


Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Chestnut West (Mezzanine Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.16 Vertical Urbanisms and the Regulatory Production of “Urban Volumes” - Panel 2
This panel aims at contributing to the debates about the diversity of “vertical urbanisms” (Harris, 2014) and vertical patterns of urbanization. It will do so by unpacking the complex relationship between regulatory frameworks that produce and distribute the rights to built in the air or underground with the dynamics of capital accumulation through the built environment. This panel seeks to explore the lesser-known diversity of policies, rules and regulations that allow for the vertical expansion of the urban fabric and the conflicts and controversies it entails with a socio-technical approach.


Moderator: Manuel Appert, Lyon University


Tokyo's Rapid Verticalisation and the Deregulation of Urban Standards in Japan 
Raphaël Languillon, Geneva University

Big Buildings, Big Deals: Finance, Regulation, and the Politics of Volume in Los Angeles 
Renee Tapp, Clark University

The « Immeuble de Belle Hauteur », A Common Figure of Progressive and Residential Vertical Urbanization in the French Cities? 
Geoffrey Molle, University of Lyon


Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Willow East (Mezzanine Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.17 Mega-Event Planning: Sporting Events as Political Tools for Urban Growth, Regeneration, and Revitalization
The political strategy of using global sporting events, such as the Olympics, for urban regeneration, economic growth, and global image creation, are at a cross-roads. On the one hand, previous host cities show a renewed interest in staging mega-events, e.g. Paris 2024 Olympics and Los Angeles 2028 Olympics. On the other hand, the wave of recent bid cancellations may signal the end of a mega-event era. Presentations will explore the various impacts the bidding, planning and/or hosting of events have had on their hosts economically, politically, socially, and spatially. Panelists will end the session by discussing the future of events as political tools.


Moderator: Eva Kassens-Noor, Michigan State University 


When Entrepreneurial Cities Stop Buying Mega-Events 
John Lauermann, City University of New York


A ‘Host of Priorities’: A Post Mortem of Toronto’s Recent Pursuit of Sport Development 
Robert Oliver, Virginia Tech


A Mega-Event Center and the Economics of Tourism in Las Vegas: Can A $2 Billion Stadium Payoff for The Public and Private Sectors? 
Mark Rosentraub, University of Michigan; Mackenzie Zondak, University of Michigan; Madelaine Moeke, University of Michigan; Sierra Bain, University of Michigan


Reconsidering the Mega-event Strategy: How Do the Olympics Impact Cities? 
Greg Andranovich, California State University Los Angeles; Matthew Burbank, University of Utah


Transportation Planning and Policy During Mega-Events: Boston’s 2024 Olympic Bid 
Eva Kassens-Noor, Michigan State University

Speakers
Moderator
avatar for Eva Kassens-Noor

Eva Kassens-Noor

Michigan State University
“Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought.”Albert Szent-Györgyi[Nobel Prize 1937]

Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Willow Centre (Mezzanine Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.18 Ongoing Urban Distress in the Post-Industrial Midwest
With so much focus on the “regeneration” of places like Detroit and Cleveland, the vast spaces of major distress in the region are sometimes forgotten. This session is composed of papers dedicated to studying historical and ongoing sources of marginalization and deprivation within industrial Midwestern cities.


Moderator: Jason Hackworth, University of Toronto 


Urban Decline as White Reaction 
Jason Hackworth, University of Toronto


Squatters or Homesteaders? The Unequal Outcomes of Regulating Property Informality in Detroit 
Claire Herbert, Drexel University


Instrumental Exploitation: Negotiations at City’s End 
Joshua Akers, University of Michigan-Dearborn; Eric Seymour, Brown University


Flint Residents’ Lack of Mobility in the Wake of the Water Crisis 
Victoria Morckel, University of Michigan-Flint; Bernadette Hanlon, Ohio State University


Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Chestnut East (Mezzanine Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.19 Land, Urbanization & Expropriation - II
Access to land is at the heart of political-economic debates over urbanization. These debates have traditionally placed the role of capital accumulation and class struggle at the center of how urban land markets are understood (Harvey, 1978; Christophers, 2011). Following recent efforts to expand this capital-centric lens (Fraser, 2014, Glassman, 2006), this session seeks to consider land through the framework of expropriation, a concept that includes (economic) accumulation by dispossession, but also includes forms of dispossession that operate through other forms of domination such as racism and white supremacy, patriarchy, colonialism, and settler-colonialism. In the contemporary context of land investment and urbanization functioning as primary conduits for financial accumulation, how is exclusion from land carried out, justified, and contested?


These two sessions explore policy, the state, and economic development in relation to frontiers of land commodification and expropriation. Theoretically and empirically based papers analyze historical and contemporary practices of, justifications for, and contestations of exclusion, oppression, and expropriation.


Moderator: Benjamin Teresa, Virginia Commonwealth University


Land as Collective Property: Comparing Different Models and Dimensions 
Sabine Horlitz, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

From Family to Financialized Properties: Race and Uneven Development in the Reemergence of the Land Contract 
Benjamin Teresa, Virginia Commonwealth University

“Right to the City” Planning and Insurgent Practices Fortaleza Periphery
Clarissa Freitas, Universidade Federal do Ceará

The Mobilities of Segregation

Eliot Tretter, University of Calgary



Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Pine West (Mezzanine Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.20 Public-Private Collaboration in City Building
Over the past decade and a half public-private partnerships (PPPs) have received widespread academic attention. Many scholars have studied the public-private provision of public infrastructures in terms of how it is governed and how it performs. This panel will view partnerships from a different angle, studying their role in regard to city building and thereby abandoning the traditional focus on long-term infrastructure contracts. The panelists discuss new avenues for research. These include the role of PPP units within the industry and the tensions inherent to that role; the opportunities of using the concept of collaborative advantage in PPP research; the emergence of new, meaningful forms of partnership which is reflected in the development of mixed-use buildings; and finally, the use of contractual analysis as a method to explain how practices and values in urban redevelopment partnerships evolve over time.


Moderator: Martijn van den Hurk, University of Amsterdam



Collaborative Advantage and Public-Private Partnerships: An Opportunity to Reframe the Benefits of Partnering? 
David Roberts, University of Toronto


City Building through Innovative Public-Private Partnerships 
Matti Siemiatycki, University of Toronto


Contracts for Urban Transformation: Different Times and Models, Same Results? 
Martijn van den Hurk, University of Amsterdam


Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Pine East (Mezzanine Floor)

3:10pm

TH3.10.21 Institutional Fragmentation and Mass Transit
Overcoming Institutional Barriers to Regional Transportation: The Transit Governance Index Development and Validation
Thomas Skuzinski, Virginia Tech; David Weinreich, University of Texas, Arlington

Mass Transit, Institutional Governance, and the Effects of State Partisanship 
Daniel Bliss, Illinois Institute of Technology

Complex Interactions Across Governmental and Sectoral Boundaries 
Ann O'M. Bowman, Texas A&M University; William Brown, Texas A&M University; Laurie Paarlberg, Texas A&M University; 

Mind the Gap: Exploring TransLink’s 2001 Failure to Implement a Vehicle Levy to Fund Transportation Improvements in the Greater Vancouver Region
Katelyn McDougall, Simon Fraser University; Anthony Perl, Simon Fraser University


Thursday April 5, 2018 3:10pm - 4:35pm
Willow West (Mezzanine Floor)

4:30pm

4:40pm

5:10pm

5:30pm

6:30pm

6:31pm

Dinner (on your own)
Thursday April 5, 2018 6:31pm - 8:31pm
TBA
 
Friday, April 6
 

TBA

Loyola University Chicago (Applications for fall 2019 accepted until June 30 with limited fellowships!)

Immerse Yourself in Urban Studies in the heart of Chicago. Prepare for leadership in government, nonprofit, and business sectors with Loyola’s two-year Master of Arts in Urban Affairs or Master of Public Policy. Applications for fall 2019 accepted until June 30 with limited fellowships. Learn more at LUC.edu/UAA.



Friday April 6, 2018 TBA
TBA

6:15am

6:59am

6:59am

7:00am

7:15am

7:15am

FR7.15.01 Institutional Member Roundtable
Join the UAA Membership Committee in discussing how the association can best serve its institutional members and grow institutional membership.


The roundtable will provide an opportunity to learn about new initiatives such as the UAA Honor Society and share strategies for dealing with financial and institutional issues.


Heywood Sanders, University of Texas at San Antonio


Friday April 6, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:15am

FR7.15.02 Planning for the Sustainable Recovery of Puerto Rico After Hurricane María
Join in this wide-ranging discussion of the challenges and opportunies for engagement in the rebuilding efforts.  One example of direct engagement will be shared about the efforts of the Graduate School of Planning at the University of Puerto Rico.

Luis Santiago, University of Puerto Rico

Speakers
avatar for Luis Santiago

Luis Santiago

Professor, University of Puerto Rico
I am interested in ecosystem services and their applicability to urban and regional planning processes.


Friday April 6, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:15am

FR7.15.03 Themes and Measurements of Urban Innovation: Cases from Guangzhou International Award for Urban Innovation (GIAUI)
Urban innovation has become the new driving force for economic growth and government reform in cities around the world. As a broad and multi-disciplinary concept, what are the various themes measurements of urban innovation and does it have different connotations in academic research and professional practice? We will start the conversation with cases submitted to the Guangzhou International Award for Urban Innovation (GIAUI) and continue with this dialogue. GIAUI was launched in 2012 as a biannual award for urban innovation around the world. In the last three events over 700 cases were submitted for this award and provides a rich database to examine these questions.


Cathy Liu, Georgia State University; Lin Ye, Sun Yat-Sen University; Zhilin Liu, Tsinghua University

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Liu

Cathy Liu

Associate Professor, Georgia State University
LY

Lin Ye, Sun Yat-sen University

Sun Yat-Sen University


Friday April 6, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:15am

FR7.15.04 Discussing Controversial Topics in the Classroom
The purpose of this roundtable is to discuss traditional, as well as current, trends in urban affairs pedagogy given the tense political climate across the U.S. This discussion seeks to bring together faculty, students, and practitioners from across the gamut of urban affairs fields (public policy, political science, sociology, social work, psychology, etc.) to share and explore strategies for engaging a diverse student body in candid discussions. Various topics will be discussed, including the appropriate mixture of theory and real-world application acceptable in a classroom setting.


Kelechi Uzochukwu, University of Baltimore


Friday April 6, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:15am

FR7.15.05 Rethinking the Meaning of Livable Communities: Academic Perspectives
This breakfast roundtable will present perspectives from across the US on the topic of livable communities. The development of such communities is becoming an important part of community development, urban design, policy planning and urban affairs. With the desire by urban scholars throughout N. America and Europe to move from communities that are often described as sterile and boring places to live, it is important to understand the factors that make communities livable. This roundtable will discuss what has gone wrong in many communities and will offer suggestions for making them more livable. Moreover, the discussion will focus on rethinking the meaning of livable communities.

 David Perry, University of Illinois--Chicago


Friday April 6, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:15am

FR7.15.06 Positive Youth Development Strategies in Mixed-Income Developments
Based on both theory and evidence, youth should be the biggest beneficiaries of a move to a mixed-income development. New longitudinal research by economist Raj Chetty and colleagues (2015) proves that children who were under age 13 experienced significant and long-term educational, health, and economic benefits when their families moved out of poverty-concentrated public housing developments through the Moving to Opportunity programs. However, there has been no comparable longitudinal research on the impacts of living in mixed-income developments on youth. In addition, research and practitioners found that youth (defined by the United Nations as ages 15 to 24) are often sources of friction and targets of surveillance and exclusionary treatment (Chaskin, Sichling, & Joseph, 2013; Clampet-Lundquist, Edin, Kling, & Duncan, 2011).


Successful, inclusionary mixed-income development should leverage the opportunity to break the generational cycle of poverty by engaging and empowering youth. Yet, few mixed-income developments have a comprehensive positive youth development strategy, designed for urban realities of race and class stigma, and customized to a mixed-income context. The scan of the field sought to address this gap by studying five mixed-income developments with exemplary positive youth development strategies to document and contrast their approaches, describe their evolution and achievements, explore the challenges of effective youth engagement and identify best practices and implications for mixed-income policy and practice.


An in-depth case study approach was used to examine exemplary approaches to positive youth development in mixed-income developments. Five mixed-income developments participated in this scan: Park Boulevard in Chicago, IL, Regent Park in Toronto, Canada, Heritage Park in Minneapolis, MN, New Columbia in Portland, OR and Villages of East Lake in Atlanta, GA.




Taryn Gress, Case Western Reserve University

Speakers
avatar for Taryn Gress

Taryn Gress

Project Coordinator for the National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities, The National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities, Case Western Reserve University
mixed-income development, affordable housing, community and social development


Friday April 6, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:15am

FR7.15.07 From Global to Globalizing Cities: Theory, Methods, and Evidence
This roundtable is convened by the editors of the new Globalizing Cities Reader (Routledge, 2018). Originally published in 2006 and edited by Neil Brenner and Roger Keil, theReader curates both foundational works and cutting-edge research in global urban studies. Fully revised, the second edition of the Reader reflects how the geographies of urban theory have shifted away from the Western vantage point from which much of the classic work in global urban studies was developed. The book includes 60 chapters that cover both established global cities and less-known urban regions, both cities in the global North and global South that are undergoing processes of globalization and restructuring. The editors invite colleagues to join us for a lively conversation on the future directions of global urban studies, in theory, methods, and evidence.


Xuefei Ren, Michigan State University; Roger Keil, York University


Friday April 6, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:15am

FR7.15.08 Urban Leadership, Economic Development, and Combating Growing Urban Economic Inequality
Patterns of urban economic development have in many instances exacerbated economic inequalities in US cities. This roundtable seeks to engage participants in a discussion about what role urban leadership and particularly mayors can and might play in stemming this trend. The discussion might also include a focus on examples of mayoral leadership that is advancing an equity promoting economic development agenda.


Friday April 6, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:15am

FR7.15.09 Getting Published for Emerging Scholars
This breakfast roundtable will review the general guidelines for publication. It is specifically for graduate students as they prepare to submit thesis and dissertation contributions for publication. The presenters will discuss constructing articles from the dissertation, the submission, revision, and re-submission process. Specific information will be provided on responding to reviewers' and editors' feedback.


Michael Owens, Emory University; Ali Modarres, University of Washington Tacoma


Friday April 6, 2018 7:15am - 8:00am
Grand East (Lower Concourse--2 floors below lobby)

7:59am

Concurrent Sessions
Friday April 6, 2018 7:59am - 9:25am
TBA

8:00am

FR8.00.00 Writing and Publishing
Writing and publishing are a vital component of academic life, not only to get our ideas and research to a wider audience, but as part of the tenure and promotion process.  However, there is little formal training available.  In this panel we bring together a number of writers and scholars to discuss their approaches to writing and publishing. We will also explore how they make time for writing and their wider reflections on the publishing process.  Speakers will discuss a number of topics including their own writing strategies, publishing in highly regarded journals, the book writing process, and academic publishing more generally. 


Moderator: Yasminah Beebeejaun, University College London 


Success through Collaboration
Anaid Yerena, University of Washington Tacoma


The Practice of Everyday Writing
Rachel Weber, University of Illinois Chicago


Writing for Academic and Non-Academic Audiences
Ed Goetz, University of Minnesota


Reflections on Academic Writing
Matthew Gandy, University of Cambridge


Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Dufferin (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.10 Race, Neo-liberalism, and Resistance: Scholar-Activists’ Theoretical and Practical Work in the Movement to Save and Transform Urban Public Education
The latest upsurge in the educational justice movement has raised a dozen new questions about the commodification of education, racial justice, tactical unity, and the possibility of successful resistance.   Given the intense pressure to commodify educational services, is there hope for saving public education?   Is there solidarity between those who fight neo-liberalism and those who fight racism?  Given the history of racial injustice within the public schools, is the fight for public education actually the answer for families of color?  Can solidarity between unions and community exist beyond defensive battles and extend to a new vision for schools?  Are the perceived “rules” of academia an impediment to activism?    How do scholars whose own lives make them part of these movements combine participation in them and writing about them?


Each of the colloquy participants has given leadership to some aspect of these movements while working to theorize both their trajectories and their significance.  Our colloquy examines the ways activism informs scholarship, and conversely, the roles scholar-activists are playing in the movements. There will be time devoted to an exchange on these topics by everyone in the room.  


Moderator: Jaron Epstein, Holy Names University


Solidarity in Black and White:  The Importance of Race in Progressive Educational Movements 
Kimberly Mayfield Lynch, Holy Names University


Remaking Racial Capitalism:  The Role of Race in Neoliberal School Reform   
Nirali Jani, Holy Names University


Place-Identity at a Predominantly White Institution: Civic Engagement in My City 
Anetha Ann Perry, Rutgers University


Thinking Big: The Role of “Scholar-Activists" in Transforming Urban Education and Urban Society 
Kitty Kelly Epstein, Holy Names University

Speakers
avatar for Kitty Kelly Epstein

Kitty Kelly Epstein

Professor, Holy Names University and Fielding Graduate University
In 2013 Kitty Kelly Epstein was honored with the Activist Scholar Award at the national conference of the Urban Affairs Association.  This was based on her work in Oakland, California where she led an innovation in democracy that consisted of 41 groups comprised of 800 people whose... Read More →
avatar for Anetha A Perry

Anetha A Perry

Graduate, Ph.D. Student, Rutgers University Camden
Anetha Ann Perry (affectionately also known as “Sis. Perry”), was raised in Camden, NJ, which is known as a poverty stricken, high crime and poorly educated population. She is currently a full-time, 3rd year Ph.D. graduate assistant at Rutgers University - Camden, Department... Read More →
avatar for Kimberly Mayfield Lynch, Holy Names University

Kimberly Mayfield Lynch, Holy Names University

Dean- School of Education, Holy Names Univeristy
Kimberly Mayfield is an Associate Professor and Dean of the School of Education at Holy Names University. She received her doctorate in Learning and Instruction from the University of San Francisco. Her research interests and activism include creating a permanent diverse teaching... Read More →
avatar for Nirali Jani, Holy Names University

Nirali Jani, Holy Names University

Assistant Professor
Research interests:  school reform; neoliberal governance; urban educational policy and discourse; race and racial justice; teacher education in neoliberal contexts; community organizing

Moderator
avatar for Jaron Epstein, Holy Names University

Jaron Epstein, Holy Names University

Graduate Student, Holy Names University

Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Huron (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.19 A Women's Place: Theorizing Gender and Gentrification
Win Curran notes in her new book Gender and Gentrification (Routledge 2018): “Gender is just one of the lenses through which we can view how gentrification reinforces urban inequalities, but given how important it is to the shaping of urban space, it has been profoundly under-studied, and the work that has been done is under-cited in the literature.” This panel aims to change this course and bring light to the work of scholars who are interested in gender in the re-shaping of urban space, and vice versa. This includes questions about social reproduction, the right to the city, planning processes, the gendered division of labor, housing markets, schools, and policing policies, and community and displacement in the context of mixed-income public housing redevelopment, among others. We aim to go beyond the stories and case studies often used to describe gentrification and its effects, to develop and advance theoretical frames that expand our understanding of the mass redevelopment of urban space through a gender lens. This involves recognizing gender as a foundational, organizing principle underlying and shaping urban processes, rather than as a secondary or incidental set of relations to those of capitalist urban development. 


Moderator: Janet Smith, University of Illinois at Chicago 


Gender and Gentrification 
Win Curran, DePaul University

Gender as a Foundational, Organizing Principle Underlying and Shaping Urban Processes 
Leslie Kern, Mount Allison University

Gender, Planning Process and Working With Communities 
Janet Rongerude, Iowa State University

Social Reproduction and Urban Dynamics 
Janet Smith, University of Illinois at Chicago


Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
City Hall Room (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.01 Finance-Led Capitalism, Housing and Urban Inequalities IV: Neoliberalism and the Gentrification of Rental Housing
Cities across the globe have been undergoing a massive transformation in the aftermath of the 2008 global financial crisis. While some cities have witnessed deepening poverty, foreclosures, and homelessness, others have experienced bubbling property markets, rampant gentrification, and rental housing crises. Some cities have witnessed both processes simultaneously, with effects on social, income, and wealth inequalities that vary along axes of difference such as race, gender, class, age, and citizenship. Undergirding such changes has been a reorganization of the global financial system, with new kinds of lenders and insidious innovations in new credit products. Simultaneously many countries have implemented national consumer protection strategies, financial literacy initiatives, and financially inclusive policy, which potentially serve their stated purposes of strengthening the financial resilience of individuals and households, but can also be conceptualized as deepening processes of state-led neoliberalism and finance-led transformation. Comparison between cities, countries and their associated policy initiatives will promote dialogue on the scalar components and effects of contemporary finance-led capitalism.


This fourth panel in the series explores the relationship between finance-led capitalism, state policies, austerity urbanism, and the gentrification of rental housing, including subsidized or state-run rental housing communities. As in the other related sessions, this panel empirically examines these issues among case-study cities, including the San Francisco bay area (USA), Dublin (Ireland), Haifa and Jerusalem (Isreal), and Canada (Toronto, and remote northern cities).


Moderator: Susanne Soederberg, Queen's University


Social Finance and the City: “Ethical” Investing and the Governance of Housing in Poor Urban Spaces 
Emily Rosenman, University of Toronto


Debtfare and Displacement in Dublin: Rental Housing Crisis in Austerity Urbanism 
Susanne Soederberg, Queen's University


Financialized Communities: Assessing the Effect of Market-Led Regeneration on Israeli Neighborhoods 
Yinnon Geva, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Gillad Rosen, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem


Canada’s Rental Housing Goldmine: The Financialization of Apartments from the Trailer Park to the Tar Sands
Martine August, University of Waterloo


Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Kent (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.02 Technology and Urban Governance
How the Government Responds to Citizen Responses in SNS: A Case Study on the City of Phoenix 
Minsang Yi, Seoul National University; So Won Seon, Arizona State University

Information Infrastructure In/equity: from Libraries to Broadband 
Gwen Urey, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

Implications of Sharing Economy for Urban Governance 
Sukumar Ganapati, Florida International University; Christopher Reddick, University of Texas at San Antonio


Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Pine West (Mezzanine Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.03 Affordable Housing Development
The Rise of Social Rental Housing in East Asia 
Yi-Ling Chen, University of Wyoming

Affordable Housing as Disaster Mitigation 
Mai Nguyen, UNC-Chapel Hill; Amanda Martin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Kirstin Frescoln, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The Difference Partnerships Make: Affordable Housing Deliberation in Melbourne and Toronto 
Carolyn Whitzman, University of Melbourne

Willingness to Pay for Sharing House: Trade-off between Privacy and Housing Affordability 
Jeongseob Kim, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology; Ayoung Woo, Sejong University; Ji-Hoon Jeong, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology; Ji-Hoon Jeong, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology; Dan-Bee Choi, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology

Speakers
avatar for Mai Nguyen

Mai Nguyen

Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
JK

Jeongseob Kim, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology

Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology
avatar for Yi-Ling Chen, University of Wyoming

Yi-Ling Chen, University of Wyoming

Director, Associate Professor, University of Wyoming, International Studies/Geography

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Churchill (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.04 LIHTC: Development Processes and Outcomes
“This Ain’t the Projects”: Examining the Linkages between Fair Housing and Opportunity for LIHTC Residents 
Carolina Reid, University of California, Berkeley

Who is My Neighbor? Low Income Housing and the Neighborhood Characteristics in Milwaukee 
Tathagato Chakraborty, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Reexamining the Relationship between Low Income Housing Tax Credit Developments, Race, and Poverty in Boston 
Hannah Cross, Newton Housing Authority; Shomon Shamsuddin, Tufts University

Do Developers Utilize Location Incentives in Applying for Low-Income Housing Tax Credit?
Yiwen Kuai, University of California, Los Angeles

Affordable Housing with Low-Income Housing Tax Credit Financing in Detroit: The Challenges at Year 15 
Margaret Dewar, University of Michigan; Lan Deng, University of Michigan; Melissa Bloem, University of Michigan


Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Wentworth (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.05 Redevelopment, Infrastructure Project and Social Justice
Community Benefit Agreements: Good Green Jobs or Negotiated Neoliberalism? Evaluating CBA Negotiations for Toronto's Eglinton Crosstown LRT Project 
James Nugent, University of Toronto

Co-evolutionary Perspectives on the Enablers and Barriers for Low-carbon Transitions of City-Wide District Energy Systems in the U.S
Kangkang Tong, University of Minnesota; Anu Ramaswami, University of Minnesota


Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Elgin (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.06 Immigrants Finding Their "Space"
What is Success? Immigrants’ Perception of Successful Integration in Canada 
Emmanuel Kyeremeh, Western University; Godwin Arku, Western University; Evan Cleave, Western University

Determinants of County Migrant Regularization Policymaking in the US: Understanding Temporal and Spatial Realities 
M. Anne Visser, University of California, Davis; Sheryl-Ann Simpson, University of California, Davis

Sanctuary in the Streets: Activating Urban Space in the Fight for Immigrant Justice 
Bethany Welch, Aquinas Center

Public Housing Transformation: Effects on Immigrant Communities 
Joanna Lucio, Arizona State University; Angel Molina, Arizona State University


Speakers
avatar for Bethany Welch, Aquinas Center

Bethany Welch, Aquinas Center

Executive Director, Aquinas Center
Bethany J. Welch, Ph.D. is the founding director of Aquinas Center. Her research on the Catholic Church and urban revitalization prompted Philadelphia’s St. Thomas Aquinas parish to invite her to help them repurpose a former convent to create a space that builds unity in diversity... Read More →

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Kenora (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.07 Stages of Life, Food Access and Disease Prevention
Restaurant Landscapes and Travel Behavior across Three Urban Typologies: An Analysis of the Detroit Metropolitan Region 
Jeanette Eckert, Michigan State University; Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University , Urban Youth Shaping Health

Justice & Sustainability: From a Gardener's Perspective   
Stephanie Boddie, Baylor University

Increasing Food Access in Austin, Texas: The Role of Small Grocery Stores 
Clare Zutz, University of Texas at Austin

Engaging with the city: everyday dynamics of participation in old age
Liina Sointu, University of Tampere


Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Maple East (Mezzanine Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.08 Toward Equity and Justice in Urban Labor Markets
Scholars and practitioners calling for more just and equitable modes of urban development increasingly focus on the “work of cities” - namely, the quality of, and equitable access to, employment opportunities generated in the contemporary city. Panelists will discuss the changing landscape of urban labor markets and how actors and institutions are responding through policy tools and political organizing in pursuit of more equitable outcomes.


Moderator: Laura Wolf-Powers, City University of New York 


Equity Themes and Entrepreneurial Means: The Policy Entrepreneurship Behind the $15 Minimum Wage 
Marc Doussard, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


The Local State Goes to Work for Justice: Understanding Adoption of Targeted Hire Policies 
Greg Schrock, gschrock@pdx.edu


Splintered Metropolitan Opportunity? Re-Examining the Relationship Between Employment Centers and Inner City Job Opportunity 
T. William Lester, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Nikhil Kaza, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Taylor McAdam, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill


Do Hospitals Actually Want to Be Anchor Institutions?: What “Meds” Spend on Community Development 
Stephen Averill Sherman, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Maple West (Mezzanine Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.09 Social and Political History of Cities and Neighbourhoods
Deindustrialization in America’s Rust Belt: Do Governing Coalitions Build Urban Resiliency in the Case of Buffalo, NY and Pittsburgh, PA? 
Maureen Heffern Ponicki, University of Illinois at Chicago

The Enduring Neighborhood Effects of Place-Based Terror 
Mary Rocco, Barnard College; Benjamin Chrisinger, Stanford University

Changing Landscapes of Recreation and Race in Richmond, VA 
Melina Patterson, University of Mary Washington

Silent City: The Reel American City Before Movies Talked 
Douglas Muzzio, Baruch College, City University of New York

Speakers
Moderator
DM

Douglas Muzzio

Baruch College, CUNY, Marxe School of Public Affairs, Baruch College, City University of New York
Professor Political Science, first UAA conference Flint, anything.

Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Mackenzie (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.11 Heteronormative Bias and Selective Police Actions
Geographies of Enforced Heteronormativity in Public Parks: A Case Study of Project 
Marie Bronwyn Clement, University of Toronto

Intersectional Subjection, LGBTQ People of Color, and Law Enforcement 
Brandi Blessett, Rutgers University-Camden; Tia Gaynor, Marist College


Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Roosevelt (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.15 Green Infrastructures, Urban Design and Resilience
Infrastructure by Design 
Jason Sowell, The University of Texas at Austin; Kristine Stiphany, Texas Tech University

Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) Stations in the Flood Plains: Reclaiming Public Transit for Mobility and Multifunctionality 
Jared Enriquez, Cornell University; Arash Beheshtian, Cornell University

Resilient Urban Design: Shaping the Spatial Politics of Risk in a Crisis-Prone World 
Lawrence Vale, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Zachary Lamb, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Speakers
JS

Jason Sowell, Texas Tech University

Associate Professor, Texas Tech University
Jason Sowell is a registered architect and an associate professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture at Texas Tech University. His research, practice, and teaching focus upon the intersection among architecture, landscape architecture, and technology in urban regions. His... Read More →

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Chestnut West (Mezzanine Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.16 Land Use Strategies and Policies
The Impact of Land Use Patterns on Property Tax Revenue in Stevens Point, Wisconsin 
Ismaila Odogba, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point; Christine Koeller, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point; Yoon Bin Bae, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point

The Impact of Compact and Mixed Development on Land Value: A Case Study of Richmond, Virginia 
I-Shian (Ivan) Suen, Virginia Commonwealth University  

Recent Developments in Zoning Regulations for Tiny Houses 
Kathryn Terzano, Arizona State University

Critical Approaches to the Role of Urban Planning in the Creation of Montreal's Innovation District 
Priscilla Ananian, University of Quebec in Montreal

Land Management in Nigeria: Challenges to Urban Development
Sabina Chiaka Osuji, Imo State University Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria

Speakers
avatar for Sabina Chiaka Osuji, Imo University Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria

Sabina Chiaka Osuji, Imo University Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria

Lecturer, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Imo State University Owerri
I AM A LECTURER ALSO A PhD CANDIDATE UNIVERSITY OF NIGERIA, NSUKKA, ENUGU CAMPUS, ENUGU, NIGERIA ABOUT URBAN PLANNING AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Willow East (Mezzanine Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.17 Residential Mobility, Class and Ethnicity
“How Would You Spend a Million Dollars?” A Tale of Neighborhood Redevelopment and Participatory Budgeting 
Laura Pin, York University

Just Revitalization in Shrinking Cites? 
Renia Ehrenfeucht, University of New Mexico; Marla Nelson, University of New Orleans

The Patchwork Metropolis: The Morphology of the Divided Post-Industrial City 
Patrick Adler, University of California, Los Angeles; Richard Florida, University of Toronto


Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Simcoe (2nd Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.18 Understanding Regional Factors in Economic Development
Rethinking the Legacy City: Evidence Matters
Andrew Van Leuven, John Glenn College of Public Affairs, The Ohio State University; Edward W. Hill, John Glenn College of Public Affairs, The Ohio State University

High-Growth Firms and Regional Economic Outcomes: Antecedents and Implications
Merissa Piazza, Cleveland State University

Entrepreneurship in Small Cities: Evidence from U.S. Micropolitan Areas 
Haifeng Qian, The University of Iowa; Shiqin Liu, Northeastern University



Speakers
Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Willow Centre (Mezzanine Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.20 Creating Spaces for Participation: Expanding (and Contracting) the Public Square
Student Perceptions of Democracy and Civic Engagement from NYC Community Meetings 
Leigh Graham, John Jay College-CUNY

Everyday Evaluations of Public Engagement 
Andrew Morgan, University of Toronto

Venue Creation in Participatory Decision-making: From Practitioners’ Accounts to Theoretical Framework 
Jeeson Oh, The Ohio State University; Mattijs van Maasakkers, The Ohio State University

Stratified and Defensive Democracy: A study of Israeli Planning Hearings 
Talia Margalit, Tel Aviv University; Adriana Kemp, Tel Aviv University

Speakers
LG

Leigh Graham, John Jay College, CUNY

John Jay College of Criminal Justice
avatar for Talia Margalit, Tel Aviv University

Talia Margalit, Tel Aviv University

Senior Lecturer, Tel Aviv University, School of Architecture

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Chestnut East (Mezzanine Floor)

8:00am

FR8.00.21 How Are Regions Governed?
This session considers the question: how are regions are governed? As such it will promote and provide a critical forum for innovative regional scholarship. It will also provide additional empirical and theoretical material related to UAA panels that consider the state of regional scholarship more broadly (such as Michael Glass’s proposed panel “Current Debates and Practices in Regional Research”).
Regions as the subject of scholarly inquiry are important. We know that there are all sorts of mechanisms, formal and informal, through which regional affairs are negotiated and arranged. In the United States, these go by the names of Councils of Governments, Regional Planning Commissions, Mayor’s Caucuses, Regional Coalitions, Metropolitan Planning Organizations, Economic Development Districts, and many others. Outside of the U.S. there are a similar range of solutions to the persistent problem of governing across local government boundaries in what is often loosely defined subnational space. Yet, there is only a limited understanding of the ways in which interests and policies are coordinated in the regional ‘spaces’ by these various entities.
This session unites contributions that explore theoretical or empirical questions related to how regions are governed. These investigate, and critically assess, emerging or durable structures of regional governance. Other contributions plumb questions about who is represented, how competing interests are mediated, or of the complexities that can undermine (or empower) regional partnerships.


Moderator: Jen Nelles, Hunter College


Determinants or Detriments of Cooperation? Toward an Understanding Regional Council Organizations 
Suzanne Leland, UNC Charlotte


The Unvarnished Truth about Large Cities' Representation in American Regional Intergovernmental Organizations (RIGOs) 
Jay Rickabaugh, University of Pittsburgh


Urban Universities as Regionalizing Actors?: University-Led Development and City-Regionalism from the Periphery in Newark, New Jersey 
Jean-Paul Addie, Georgia State University





Friday April 6, 2018 8:00am - 9:25am
Cedar (Mezzanine Floor)

9:25am

9:39am

Concurrent Sessions
Friday April 6, 2018 9:39am - 11:05am
TBA

9:40am

FR9.40.22 The Journal of Urban Affairs at 40: Transitions, Transformations, and Milestones
The Journal of Urban Affairs at 40: Transitions, Transformations, and Milestones


The session will focus on the last 40 years of the Journal of Urban Affairs (JUA), with four editors discussing the JUA’s historical development, transitions, transformations, and milestones. The speakers will discuss the challenges during their term as the JUA’s editor, as well as the rewards in helping shape the field of urban studies. The evolution of topics and debates over the last four decades, the changes in methods and applications of knowledge, and the JUA’s growing interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary profile will all be explored. The transition in publishers and the move from publishing five to eight issues per year will also be discussed during this session. 


Moderator: Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University


The Historical Development of the Journal of Urban Affairs
Scott Cummings, Saint Louis University


Transitions and Trapdoors, JUA 2005-2010: Coping with Change and Expectations as Editor (and Professor)
Victoria Basolo, University of California, Irvine


Globalization, Identity, Creativity, and Sustainability: JUA 2010-2016 
Laura Reese, Michigan State University


The Journal of Urban Affairs, 2015-2018 and Beyond: A Period of Transition and Transformation 
Igor Vojnovic, Michigan State University


Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
City Hall Room (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.23 Can Cities in the US Actually Govern?
Can cities in the US actually govern? Or are they helpless in the face of global capital? Much of contemporary academic discourse, rooted in Paul Peterson’s City Limits logic, suggests both that cities cannot do very much, nor should they. This panel discusses the important new book by Richard Schragger that robustly challenges both of these conceptions. In City Power: Urban Governance in a Global Age, Professor Schragger argues that much of the supposed ‘city limits’ are rooted in constitutional structures rather then direct economic constraints. He argues that cities can in fact govern if we decide to let them, and he explains why it is crucial for the well being of urban inhabitants that cities exercise a full range of powers. In this colloquy, several critics will comment on the central arguments and insights found in City Power, followed by a summative response by Professor Schragger. 


Moderator: Judith Garber, University of Alberta


Rethinking City Power and Urban Governance in a Global Age 
Judith Garber, University of Alberta


Rethinking City Power and Urban Governance in a Global Age 
Richardson Dilworth, Drexel University


Rethinking City Power and Urban Governance in a Global Age 
Loren King, Wilfrid Laurier University


Rethinking City Power and Urban Governance in a Global Age 
Gregory Squires, George Washington University


Response to Commentators 
Richard Schragger, University of Virginia

Speakers
avatar for Loren King, Wilfrid Laurier University

Loren King, Wilfrid Laurier University

Associate Professor, Wilfrid Laurier University
I'm a political theorist who studies cities. I occasionally do some data analysis, epistemology, and formal theory. I'm a founding member of the Great Lakes Trust (greatlakestrust.org), a charitable endowment that supports science, art, and advocacy for fair and responsible water... Read More →
avatar for Richard Schragger, University of Virginia

Richard Schragger, University of Virginia

Professor of Law, University of Virginia School of Law
Richard Schragger is the Perre Bowen Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law, where he has taught since 2002. His scholarship focuses on the intersection of constitutional law and local government law, federalism, urban policy, and the constitutional and economic... Read More →

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Pine East (Mezzanine Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.00 Global Postsuburbia--Mini Track Sponsored by MCRI Global Suburbanism/Urban Studies at York University
This diverse panel takes up critical strands of thought from research on current suburbanization with case studies from Australia, Canada and Germany. This builds largely on work done around a long term global comparative research program on Global Suburbanisms: Governance, Land and Infrastructure in the 21st Century. The panel starts from the assumption that suburbia is here to stay as a phenomenon that has to be subject to critical social science research and policy action. This leads to the premise that we now live in a postsuburban world in which processes of change in the urban periphery are not ones commencing but rather are being transformed and redirected as we are living in what can be called Global Postsuburbia.


Moderator: Damaris Rose, INRS Centre Urbanisation Culture Société


‘It’s Not Easy Being Green’: The Impact of Housing and Infrastructure Development on the GrünGürtel Frankfurt 
Sara MacDonald, Utrecht University


Suburban Development in the Age of Hyper Commodification of Housing: A View from Iran 
Azam Khatam, York University


Suburbia and the Social Life of Infrastructure 
Rob Shields, University of Alberta


Producing the Suburbs: Analysing Continuing Suburbanisation 
Tony Dalton, RMIT University


Suburban Modern on the Toronto Periphery 
Steven Logan, University of Toronto Mississauga

Speakers
avatar for Tony Dalton, RMIT University

Tony Dalton, RMIT University

Professor, RMIT University
Tony is an Emeritus professor in the Centre for Urban Research at RMIT University in Melbourne Australia. The focus of Tony’s research has been on changing housing markets, distributional outcomes in a period of social and economic restructuring. More recently he has researched... Read More →

Moderator
avatar for Damaris Rose

Damaris Rose

INRS - Centre Urbanisation Culture Société
Housing and neighbourhood change (Canadian cities). Immigrant and refugee newcomer settlement issues. I’ve just finished a project on the challenges and successes of settlement organizations in finding the first permanent housing for the Syrian refugee newcomers. I’m a member... Read More →

Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Churchill (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.01 Finance-Led Capitalism, Housing and Urban Inequalities V: Generational Effects and Inequalities
Cities across the globe have been undergoing a massive transformation in the aftermath of the 2008 global financial crisis. While some cities have witnessed deepening poverty, foreclosures, and homelessness, others have experienced bubbling property markets, rampant gentrification, and rental housing crises. Some cities have witnessed both processes simultaneously, with effects on social, income, and wealth inequalities that vary along axes of difference such as race, gender, class, age, and citizenship. Undergirding such changes has been a reorganization of the global financial system, with new kinds of lenders and insidious innovations in new credit products. Simultaneously many countries have implemented national consumer protection strategies, financial literacy initiatives, and financially inclusive policy, which potentially serve their stated purposes of strengthening the financial resilience of individuals and households, but can also be conceptualized as deepening processes of state-led neoliberalism and financialization. Comparison between cities, countries and their associated policy initiatives will promote dialogue on the scalar components and effects of contemporary finance-led capitalism.


This final panel in the series examines the generational effects of changes wrought by finance-led capitalism, the significant generational and class inequalities that result, in terms of housing affordability, asset-based welfare policies, intra-urban location, and wealth transfers.


Moderator: Emily Hawes, University of Toronto


The Young and the Restless: Policy Struggles and Housing Access in the Critical Years
Lindsay Flynn, Wheaton College


Renting Urbanity: Housing Market Transitions in the Context of Growing Employment Precarity 
Markus Moos, University of Waterloo


Inter-Generational Inequality in Canada: The Role of Housing Wealth 
Emily Hawes, University of Toronto


Wealth Accumulation under the Restructuring of Housing Finance System: The Case of Korea 
Jihwan Kim, DePaul University


Dorms and Dividends: The Financialization of Student Housing in Canada
Nick Revington, University of Waterloo; Martine August, University of Waterloo


Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Kent (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.02 Social Inequality and Housing Over the Life Course: International Perspectives
Housing plays a significant role in the global production and reproduction of social inequality through the restriction or expansion of opportunities and life chances available to individuals and families over the life course. Utilizing a series of international case studies, panelists in this session will assess how housing not only produces but may also serve as a means to prevent and mitigate social inequality across life outcomes.


Questions examined in case studies from Norway and the United States,
• How do housing conditions and housing careers during childhood relate to outcomes in various areas over the life course and consequently feed into social inequality?
• How do outcomes on the housing market vary by birth cohort and life stage, both within and across tenures, and across social groups? What are the important drivers of social inequality?
• How are consequences of shocks like partnership dissolution or loss of spouse exacerbated or mitigated by past and current position and future prospects in the housing market?


Moderator: Anna Maria Santiago, Michigan State University


Educational Outcomes, Labor Market Participation and Childhood Neighborhood Exposure: Evidence from Sibling Comparisons in Norway 
George Galster, Wayne State University; Anna Maria Santiago, Michigan State University; Kristin Aarland, Oslo and Akershus University; Viggo Nordvik, Oslo and Akershus University


Neighborhood Contexts Shaping Mental Health Service Utilization among Latino and African American Youth 
Anna Maria Santiago, Michigan State University


Family Structure and Sibling Effects on Timing of Nest Leaving 
Hans Christian Sandlie, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences; Anna Maria Santiago, Michigan State University; Viggo Nordvik, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences


Do Divorces Interrupt Trajectories of Housing Consumption? 
Viggo Nordvik, Oslo and Akershus University; Gunnhild Hagestad, Oslo and Akershus University


Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Wentworth (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.03 Developing Housing, Developing Community
Optimizing Regional Complementarities in Preserving Affordable Housing: A Chicago Case Study on Community Land Trust and Land Bank Partnerships 
Natalie Prochaska, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign


Towards a Future Community? The production of Community in Community Land Trusts in the Twin Cities James 
DeFilippis, Rutgers University


Evaluating Housing Regeneration Programs from a Social Equity Point of View: The Local Community Perspective 
Nava Kainer-Persov, The Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; Naomi Carmon, The Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel


Community Land Trusts as a Social Justice Tool
Jeffrey Lowe, Texas Southern University


Cleveland's Slavic Village: Stabilizing a Neighborhood Hit Hard by the Foreclosure Crisis (2006-2016) 
William Keating, Cleveland State University

Speakers
JD

James DeFilippis

Rutgers University
avatar for Natalie Prochaska, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Natalie Prochaska, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Research Assistant, PhD Student, The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Affordable housing and commercial real estate development, Municipal land use finance, Debt securitization, Community land trusts, Community development finance

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Elgin (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.04 Non-traditional Financing and Forms of Ownership
Renting the Dream: The Rise of Single-Family Rentership in the Sunbelt Metropolis
Dan Immergluck, Georgia State University


Informal Homeownership Issues: Tracking Contract for Deed Sales 
Ann Carpenter, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta; Abram Lueders, Downtown Memphis Commission; Chris Thayer, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta/Georgia Tech


The Impact of Single-Family Rental REITS on Regional Housing Markets: A Case Study of Nashville, TN 
Ken Chilton, Tennessee State University; Robert Silverman, University at Buffalo; Rabia Chaudhrey, Tennessee State University; Chihuangji Wang, University at Buffalo

Speakers
avatar for Ann Carpenter, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Ann Carpenter, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Senior Comm Dev Advisor, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Willow Centre (Mezzanine Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.06 Partnerships and Local Governance Networks in Immigrant Integration: Municipalities in Comparative Perspective (#2)
Immigrant integration has long been a salient issue for urban communities, municipal officials, and local non-governmental organizations that work with newcomer communities. This two-part panel brings together studies that investigate the local governance of immigrant integration in comparative municipal perspective, with a focus on governance mechanisms between different public entities as well as between public and private entities at the municipal level in the United States, Canada, and Europe. They ask: What are city officials doing to address immigrant integration issues? How does local context influence government narratives and programs of immigrant integration? How do cities participate in larger networks that seek to shape integration policies at the municipal level? How and where does immigrant integration fit in the work of municipal planners? How do local government officials work with non-governmental actors in developing and implementing integration policies and practices? How does the immigrant integration work of government officials in small, more remote municipalities compare with that of officials in big, urban immigrant destinations? The papers in this two-part panel address these important questions using original quantitative and qualitative data, and they draw on literatures and theoretical perspectives in political science, public policy, urban planning, sociology, and anthropology.

Moderator: Els de Graauw, Baruch College


City-based Inclusion Networks and Emerging Forms of Municipal Solidarity 
Bob W. White, University of Montreal

To Be or Not to Be Part of European Networks? French Cities and Immigration
Aude-Claire Fourot, Simon Fraser University; Aisling Healy, Université Jean Monnet Saint-Étienne et laboratoire Triangle; Anouk Flamant, Sciences Po Lyon & Triangle; Anthony Clément, Université Jean Monnet Saint-Étienne

Governance Networks and Bureaucratic Hierarchies: Explaining Diversity Policies and Their Effects in Local Administrations in Berlin
Christine Lang, Max-Planck-Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity

Good Will or Good Intentions Are Not Enough: Receiving (Im)migrants and Structuring Policies in Quebec’s Remote Regions 
Jorge Frozzini, University of Québec at Chicoutimi


Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Roosevelt (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.07 Health Status and Risk Factors in Urban Environments I
The Relationship between Food Choice and Self-Esteem in Single Mothers in Denver, Colorado 
Cindy Vong, University of Colorado Denver

An Examination of Children's Safety Associated With Their Behavior While Walking Across Crosswalks to Park Entrances
Mojgan Rafiei, National Institute for Scientific Research; Marie-Soleil Cloutier, National Institute for Scientific Research; Lambert Desrosiers-Gaudette, Universite de Montreal

Psychosis and Urban Landscapes: Understanding Environmental Triggers of Paranoid Delusions
Arturo Valladares, McGill University; Nicolás Botero, McGill University; Firrhaana Sayanvala, McGill University; Ian Gold, McGill University; Lisa Bornstein, McGill University; Daniel Weinstock, McGill University.

Exploring the Impact of Neighborhood Greenness on Mental Wellbeing: A case study in Beijing, China 
Bo Qin, Renmin University of China; Wei Zhu, Renmin University of China


Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Dufferin (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.08 Jobs, Inequality and Community Development
Current Poverty in Chicago: A Refined Understanding 
Matthew Wilson, University of Illinois at Chicago


Employment and Entrepreneurial Opportunity for Older Women: A Community Development Perspective 
Marcia Bok, University of Connecticut 


The Winners Among the Losers: Income Disparities and Federal Training Participation 
Alice K. Thomas, James Madison University

Speakers
Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Simcoe (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.10 Education, Public Policy and Urban Affairs
All Universities Are Equal, But Some Are More Equal Than Others: Imperatively Coordinated Associations in Nevada's Higher Education Policy Landscape
Caitlin J. Saladino, University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Magdalena Martinez, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Deprofessionalizing Michigan's Teachers 
Leanne Kang, Grand Valley State University

Local Politics Turns National: The Influence of Philanthropies and Intermediary Organizations on School Board Elections in Los Angeles and Atlanta 
Elizabeth DeBray, University of Georgia; Johanna Hanley, University of Georgia; Janelle Scott, UC-Berkeley; Christopher Lubienski, Indiana University

Education as the Target and Tool of Revanchist Urbanism in Turkey 
Meltem Al, McGill University , Election Timing and the Composition of the Electorate Vladimir Kogan, Ohio State University; Stephane Lavertu Lavertu, Ohio State University; Zachary Peskowitz, Emory University

Speakers
JH

Johanna Hanley

PhD student, University of Georgia
avatar for Meltem Al, McGill University

Meltem Al, McGill University

PhD student, McGill University
Meltem Al is a Ph.D. student in the School of Architecture at McGill University since 2015 under the supervision of Prof. Ipek Tureli. She holds a Master of Arts Degree in Architecture from University of California, Los Angeles supported by the Fulbright Scholarship 2013-2015. Al... Read More →
MM

Magdalena Martinez, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Dr. Magdalena Martinez is an assistant professor in the department of Public Policy and Leadership, College of Urban Affairs, and Director of Education Programs with The Lincy Institute. Her areas of expertise include education policy, leadership, access and equity for underrepresented... Read More →

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Huron (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.11 Ethnicity and Class Shaping our Daily Environments
Desiring Diversity? Neighborhood Aspirations and How Parents Think about Neighborhood Racial Composition 
Jennifer Darrah-Okike, University of Hawaii at Manoa; Hope Harvey, Harvard University; Kelley Fong, Harvard University

Amenities, Third Spaces, and Within-Neighborhood Segregation in Two Gentrifying Chicago Neighborhoods 
Steven Tuttle, Loyola University Chicago

Ten Years of Thinking and Doing: Evolving Theorization of Youth Futures 
Caroline Andrew, University of Ottawa; Vivien Runnels, University of Ottawa

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Darrah-Okike, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Jennifer Darrah-Okike, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Jennifer Darrah-Okike is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. She conducts research in the areas of urban sociology, urban development, race/ethnicity, and inequality. She has studied community mobilization against urban development, as well... Read More →

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Kenora (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.12 Environmental Policies in Urban Planning
Much of the climate change literature argues that the urban poor located in cities of the Global South are among the most vulnerable to climate change impacts (World Bank 2010). Cities are also associated with increasing levels of inequality. At the same time, climate change creates new sources of vulnerability that puts those who are not currently poor at risk. The challenge lies in how governance actors and institutions can improve adaptive capacities to climate change (Lebel et al. 2011). In urban areas, which are characterised by a diversity of ethnicity, class, and interest, supporting social justice through collective adaptation means that actions must be framed in terms of rights and governance. The ways in which urban actors can create new mechanisms of collective decision-making, engagement, and linkages to formal state institutions, remains a pressing research concern.

This session is comprised of several papers that examine distinctive but linked areas of urban vulnerability to climate change in cities of the Global South. Each paper tackles a important aspect of urban vulnerability to climate change with the goal of examining how climate change impacts citizens from an environmental justice perspective, whether it be in terms land use, health considerations or labor, as well as how citizens might enhance their resilience collectively in the face of such impacts.

Moderator: Douglas Young, York University

Theory of Reasoned Action as a frame work for communicating climate risk: A case of school children in Mekong Delta in Vietnam 
Quynh Anh Nguyen, National Institute for Science and Technology Policy and Strategy Studies; Luc Hensb,  Universidade of Nova De Lisboa, Campus de Campolide; Louis Lebel, Chiang Mai University; Charlotte MacAlisterd,  International Development Research Centre (IDRC), Boripat Lebel, Chiang Mai University; Sinh Bach Tanf, National Institute for Science and Technology Policy and Strategy Study; Manh Hung Nguyeng, Winrock International

In Pursuit of Urban Resilience: Climate Change Adaptation in Cambodian Cities 
Laura Beckwith, University of Ottawa

The challenges of environmental policies in a developing city: a case study of Lao Cai, Vietnam
Gwenn Pulliat, French National Center for Scientific Research

Migrating Towards Vulnerabilities: Cascading Impacts of Structural Violence, Climate Change & Migration on Myanmar labour Migrants in Phuket, Thailand 
Angelica De Jesus, University of Toronto


Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Chestnut West (Mezzanine Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.13 Improving Municipal Service Performance During and After Disasters
Fires and High-rise Buildings in Canadian Cities 
Ali Asgary, York University; Jenaro Nosedal-Sanchez, York University; Julianna Primiani, Ontario Ministry of Transportation; Julianna Primiani, Ontario Ministry of Transportation


Fire Response Time Variations in Urban Areas Under Normal and Large Emergencies: Case of 2013 Toronto Ice Storm and Flash Flood Emergencies 
Jenaro Nosedal-Sanchez, York University; Ali Asgary, York University; Adriano O. Solis, York University; Alireza Ghaffari, York University; Jianhong Wu, York University


Economic Development in the Post-Disaster Environment: The Case of Hurricane Katrina 
Davia Downey, Grand Valley State University


Mowing Machines: Planning for Vehicular Weaponization in the United States 
Gerard Wellman, California State University Stanislaus; Josephine Hazelton, California State University Stanislaus


The Impact of a Strong Commitment on Disaster Resilience 
Kyujin Jung, Sungkyunkwan University


Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Maple East (Mezzanine Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.14 Community-driven Urban Design, Livability and Social Justice
Socio-economic Segregation and its Relationship with Housing Improvement: A Case Study on the U.S. – Mexico Border in Brownsville 
Bara Safarova, Texas A&M University


Designing Public Spaces: Cities Built for People 
Jennifer Sloan, University of Texas at Arlington


From Public-Interest to Community-Driven Design: How Language Frames Practice 
Barbara Wilson, University of Virginia; Kevan Klosterwill, University of Virginia.edu


The Impact of Painted Ladies: Igniting Neighborhoods Everywhere: Russia, Cuba, Italy, and USA 
John I. "Hans" Gilderbloom, University of Louisville


Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Willow West (Mezzanine Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.16 Planning the Built Environment
The « Immeuble de Belle Hauteur », A common Figure of Progressive and Residential Vertical Urbanization in the French Cities? 
Geoffrey Molle, University of Lyon

Do practicing planners value plan quality: Insights from a survey of planning professionals in Ontario, Canada
Dave Guyadeen, Dalhousie University

Assessing Smart City Approaches for Economic Resiliency, Brownfield Redevelopment and Urban Greening: Case Study of Pittsburgh 
Sudeshna Ghosh, Indiana University Of Pennsylvania; Sweta Byahut, Auburn University; Calvin Masilela, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Local Land Use Policies for Coastal Resilience 
Amal K. Ali, Salisbury University


Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Linden (Mezzanine Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.17 Location Theory: Economic Policies and Private Decision-making
Incentives in Moderation: A National Study of Changing State and Local Practice 
Mary Donegan, University of Connecticut; T. William Lester, University of North Carolina; Nichola Lowe, University of North Carolina

Examining the Influence of Place Branding on Business Location Decision-Making 
Evan Cleave, University of Western Ontario; Godwin Arku, University of Western Ontario

Politics, City Limits, and Local Economic Development in a Post-Recessionary World 
Cynthia R. Rugeley, University of Minnesota Duluth; Susan M. Opp, Colorado State University; Jeffrey L. Osgood, West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Should I Stay or Should I Go: Predicting Advanced Producer Firm Entry and Exit in World Cities 
Zachary Neal, Michigan State University; Ben Derudder, Ghent University; Peter Taylor, Northumbria University

Speakers
avatar for Mary Donegan

Mary Donegan

Urban and Community Studies, University of Connecticut
ZN

Zachary Neal

Michigan State University
EC

Evan Cleave, University of Western Ontario

University of Western Ontario

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Maple West (Mezzanine Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.19 Policy Learning, Policy Failure and Policy Plagiarism: Reflective Cities in the Urban Sandbox
Plagiarism or Learning? The Policy Diffusion of Cities’ Criminal Activity Nuisance Ordinances 
Megan Hatch, Cleveland State University; Joseph Mead, Cleveland State University; J. Rosie Tighe, Cleveland State University; Marissa-Ann Pappas, Cleveland State University


Policy Failure and Fallibility: Establishing the Warrant Necessary in the Case of Vallejo’s Municipal Bankruptcy 
Mark Davidson, Clark University



Speakers
avatar for J. Rosie Tighe

J. Rosie Tighe

Associate Professor, Cleveland State University

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Mackenzie (2nd Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.20 The Platform Economy and the City I
The Platform Economy is changing the way cities live, work, and are governed. Though the benefits to consumers is self-apparent, the externalities often are not. Papers in this panel explores the urban impacts - both good and bad - that internet-platform companies like Uber, AirBnB, and TaskRabbit bring, and then make recommendations on how to best integrate/regulate this new industry into municipalities.


Moderator: Austin Zwick, University of Toronto


Is Uber a Complement or Substitute with Public Transit 
Jonathan Hall, University of Toronto


Why do Cities Partner with Uber? Understanding Reasons and Model 
Zachary Spicer, University of Toronto; Austin Zwick, University of Toronto


Occupational Safety and the City: Deregulation in Toronto’s Taxi Sector 
Emily Reid Musson, University of Waterloo; E. MacEachen, University of Waterloo; S.B. Meyer, University of Waterloo; S. S. Varatharajan, University of Waterloo; E. Bartel, University of Waterloo; A. Kosny, Institute for Work & Health


Ridehailing & World Cities: Role and Prospects for Canadian Cities 
Shauna Brail, University of Toronto



Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Chestnut East (Mezzanine Floor)

9:40am

FR9.40.21 Discourse Analysis of Public Policy and Regulation
Migrant Settlement, Cities and Rescaling: The Case of London 
Jill Simone Gross, Hunter College of the City University of New York


Symbolism, Service Provision, and Fear-Mongering: Exploring the Political Discourse on Sanctuary Cities in Canada 
Merlin Chatwin, University of Western Ontario; Samantha Torrens, University of Western Ontario; Godwin Arku, University of Western Ontario


Narratives of Equity: PPP regimes for Urban Parks 
Susanna Schaller, The City College of New York, City University of New York; Elizabeth Nisbet, John Jay College, City University of New York


Corridors, Nodes, Gateways and Powerhouses: New Spatial Imaginaries in the Governance of England’s Mersey Belt 
Iain Deas, University of Manchester


The Local Politics of Pot: A Policy-Centered Approach 
Susan E. Clarke, University of Colorado Boulder


Friday April 6, 2018 9:40am - 11:05am
Pine West (Mezzanine Floor)

11:09am

Concurrent Sessions
Friday April 6, 2018 11:09am - 12:35pm
TBA

11:10am

FR11.10.00 What Are Book Editors and Publishers Looking For? Ask Them!
Senior editors from top publishers talk candidly about book publishing  for academic authors.  Unique opportunity to ask questions of  knowledgeable and experienced book editors.  

Khadija Coxon, McGill-Queens Univeristy Press
Douglas Hildebrand, University of Alberta Press
Jodi Lewchuk, University of Toronto Press
James MacNevin, University of British Columbia (UBC) Press
Fredric Nachbaur, Fordham University Press
Juliana Pitanguy, Springer Publishing
Kate Schell, Taylor & Francis | Routledge

Speakers
avatar for Douglas Hildebrand

Douglas Hildebrand

Director & Publisher, University of Alberta Press
avatar for Fredric Nachbaur

Fredric Nachbaur

Director, Fordham University Press
As publisher of the Polis: Fordham Series in Urban Studies, I am searching for authors in fields as diverse as American Studies, Anthropology, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Urban Studies and who can write for both academic and informed lay audiences. Our objective is... Read More →
avatar for Juliana Pitanguy

Juliana Pitanguy

Springer Publishing
My name is Juliana Pitanguy and I am Associate Editor at Springer in the Netherlands. I develop the urban studies and urban geography program, inviting interest in publications and encouraging participation.

Moderator
avatar for Douglas Hildebrand

Douglas Hildebrand

Director & Publisher, University of Alberta Press

Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Dufferin (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.13 Climate Change in Cities: Innovations in Multi-Level Governance
Cities are playing a critical and leading role in shaping the trajectory and impacts of climate change action. However, urban climate change mitigation and adaptation responses are inextricably enmeshed within broader political and economic processes; new institutional interactions, new political actors, new ways of coordinating and mobilizing resources, and new frameworks and technical capacities for decision making are necessary. Generating and sustaining effective local solutions is therefore likely to require innovative and multi-level governance approaches.

This colloquy brings together a subset of authors of a recently published edited volume to discuss the book’s findings and spark conversation about promising ways forward for research on cities and climate change. The book grapples with questions arising for cities around the issue of climate change as national, regional and international political conditions shift in many parts of the world. The chapters include examinations of intergovernmental dynamics, citizen engagement, and city networks, and identify important drivers and obstacles of multi-level governance innovations in both developed and developing country contexts. We posit that informed, effective, and accountable institutions are critical to innovations in climate governance; that many of the policy tools, planning strategies, and social and political networks employed extend beyond the jurisdictional confines of many municipal governments; and that governance innovations in these contexts are intensely political and contentious.

Participants will reflect on the following questions that guide the edited volume:
1) How do existing institutional arrangements shape innovation in urban climate change governance?
2) How is climate change governance being restructured at subnational levels
3) Where is such innovation most difficult, or being encouraged?
4) What are the pressing questions cities face going forward? 


Moderator: Sara Hughes, University of Toronto 


Urban Climate Change Governance in Development Contexts 
Eric Chu, University of Birmingham

Responding to Climate Change in the U.S.: The Small City Experience 
George Homsy, Binghamton University

Financing Urban Climate Change Governance: Tools and Tactics
Jacqueline Peterson, University of Toronto

A European Perspective on the Multi-Level Governance of Climate Change in Cities
Jörg Kemmerzell, Technische Universität Darmstadt

Citizen Engagement and Urban Climate Change Adaptation
Lars Engberg, Aalborg University Copenhagen


Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Chestnut West (Mezzanine Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.18 Author Meets Critics: Bob Beauregard's Cities in the Urban Age: A Dissent (2018)
Bob Beauregard’s latest book, Cities in the Urban Age: A Dissent (University of Chicago Press, 2018) challenges urban scholars to reconsider the way we think about cities. Beauregard presents the city as a paradox, a “cauldron of haunting contradictions” spanning economic, environmental, political, and social dimensions. On Beauregard’s account, the city is defined equally by wealth and by poverty; it is simultaneously environmentally destructive and sustainable; it supports both political machines and democratic openness; it nurtures tolerance for diversity and violence across difference. These contradictions, furthermore, are not only incapable of resolution but are inherently constitutive of city-ness, of what makes the city the city. But Beauregard refuses to be helpless in the face of urban paradox. Working through and within these contradictions, he concludes, offers the only possibility for understanding and accepting our moral obligations and thus discerning a path toward urban equality, justice, and peace. Panelists working from a variety of perspectives will assess Beauregard’s account in this book, teasing out its implications for our understanding of cities in the urban age.

Moderator: Robert Lake, Rutgers University

City as Policy 
John West, Ball State University

Global City 
Cuz Potter, Korea University

City Practices 
Meg Holden, Simon Fraser University

Whose City? 
Susan Saegert, City University of New York (CUNY)

The Urban Imaginary
Robert Lake, Rutgers University

City as Paradox
Bob Beauregard, Columbia University


Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
City Hall Room (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.01 Mortgage Lending: Distribution Patterns and Outcomes
A 21st Century FHA: Understanding the Geography of Lending in Philadelphia 
Katharine Nelson, Rutgers University


Mechanisms of Racial and Ethnic Wealth-Building Inequality in U.S. Government-Sponsored Mortgage Finance from 1983-2013 
Megan Peppel, University of California, Berkeley


Spatial Differences in the Distribution of Conventional and FHA-insured Loans During and After the Crisis in Ohio 
Daisuke Nagase, The Ohio State University


Analyzing Rates of Seriously Delinquent Mortgages in non-Hispanic White Working Class Census Tracts in the United States 
Katrin Anacker, George Mason University


Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Kent (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.02 Processes of Inclusion and Exclusion in Urban Communities
Room for Improvement: Post-secondary Students’ Experiences of Marginalization in Toronto’s Housing Market 
Shelagh McCarney, Ryerson University; Luisa Sotomayor, York University; Marcelo Vieta, University of Toronto

Co-Creation: Addressing Urban Stigmatization, Building Inclusive Cities 
Juliet Carpenter, University of British Colombia, Canada; Christina Horvath, University of Bath, UK

Cultural Institution , Social Cohesion and Inclusive Urban Development : Communities in transition in Kolkata Metropolitan Region 
Sanghamitra Basu, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur; Soumi Muhuri, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur

Development and Affordable Housing in Small Islands of Asia-Pacific: Towards Pro-Poor Shelter Policies 
Ashok Das, University of Hawaii at Manoa



Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Elgin (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.03 Consumption, Lifestyle and Culture in Gentrifying Neighborhoods


Space Affordances and Cultural Resilience in Gentrifying Neighbourhoods: the Case of Colonia Roma Norte and Colonia Doctores in Mexico City 
Hélène Bélanger, Université du Québec à Montréal

Neighborhood Attachment: Theorizing Gentrification 
Sara Martucci, CUNY Graduate Center

Resisting Gentrification in Urban Queer Spaces: Reading Samuel R. Delany’s Times Square Red, Times Square Blue (1999) as Activist Scholarship
Faye Chisholm Guenther, Sheridan College




Speakers
avatar for Sara Martucci

Sara Martucci

Assistant Professor, Mercy College
gentrification, retail, housing, cultural displacement, neighborhoods

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Wentworth (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.04 The Impacts of Displacement on Residents and Communities
Where Do the Displaced Go?: Pathways of Displacement in New York City 
H. Jacob Carlson, University of Wisconsin-Madison


"The Maps Show What We Know": Community-Driven Data Analysis with the Bronx Development without Displacement Roundtable
Nicholas Shatan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Katherine Mella, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Angela A. Tovar, The Point CDC; Danny R. Peralta, The Point CDC


Local Policy Action to Address Residential Affordability and Displacement: A Mixed-Methods Study of 80 Large U.S. Cities 
Adele Cassola, Columbia University


“This Is Wrong and We Will Support You”: Neighbourhood Planning Teams as Agents in Residential Displacement 
Melanie Pothier, University of Toronto


Where Do They Go? The Destinations of Residents Moving From Gentrifying Neighborhoods 
Lance Freeman, Columbia University; Jackelyn Hwang, Stanford University; Tyler Haupert, Columbia University


Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Churchill (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.06 Change and Mobility Among the Immigrant Popuation 
Asian American Community Organizations Outside Gateway Cities in the U.S. 
C.K. Richard Hung, University of Massachusetts Boston

Re-assessing Continuity and Change in Three U.S. Metropolitan Areas 
Nathan Foote, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

The Role of Middle Class in Regional Economic Performance – The Story of the Last Three Decades for the U.S. Metropolitan Areas 
"Rosa" Hyun Kyong Lee, George Washington University

The Impact of Job Mobility on Wage Growth for Floating Population 
Ming Tian, Beijing Normal University; Yunlei Qi, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities


Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Kenora (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.07 Health Status and Risk Factors in Urban Environments 2
The Missing Link of Air Pollution:  A Closer Look at the Association between Place and Life Expectancy in 148 Mid-Sized Cities
John Gilderbloom, University of Louisville; Shahbaz Altaf, University of Louisville; Karrie Ann Quenichet, University of Louisville; Karrie Ann Quenichet, University of Louisville; Venkata Gullapalli, University of Louisville


Urban Greenspace as a Health-promoting Resource: Assessing the Distributional Impact of Air Pollution and Greenspace on Asthma Prevalence 
Jason A. Douglas, San José State University; Serena E. Alexander, San José State University; Reginald Archer, Tennessee State University


Considering Intersectionality in Cancer Prevention: The Competing Spheres of Justice in Urban Environments 
Alexander Wray, University of Waterloo; Jennifer Dean, University of Waterloo





Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Maple West (Mezzanine Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.08 Emerging Nontraditional Employment/Labor Trends

Emerging Bicycle Workers: Variety, Work Organisation, Motivations, and Security Issues 
David Carpentier-Laberge, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique; Ugo Lachapelle, Université du Québec À Montréal; Marie-Soleil Cloutier, Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique


Making the Gig Economy Work for Everyone: Strategies to Reduce Precarity for Contingent Workers 
Ric Kolenda, DePaul University


A First Look at the Urban Gig Economy 
Janet Kelly, University of Louisville; Kelly Kinahan, University of Louisville

Speakers
avatar for Ric Kolenda, DePaul University

Ric Kolenda, DePaul University

Professional Lecturer, DePaul University
Professional Lecturer of Public Policy at DePaul University’s School of Public ServiceAfter receiving a B.S. in Economics from Grand Valley State University in 1984 and a M.A. in Urban Studies from Temple University in 1987, Ric took several courses in a Ph.D. Program in Political... Read More →

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Maple East (Mezzanine Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.09 Social Media, Technology and Participation in Urban Life
Performance, Transparency, and Accountability: An Analysis of U.S. Cities’ Websites 
Domonic Bearfield, Texas A&M University; Ann Bowman, Texas A&M University

Political Ads and News in Local Places: The 2016 Campaign 
Danilo Yanich, University of Delaware

Understanding Red Hook WIFI through Participatory Action Research
Aditi Mehta, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

When Photovoice Meets Social Media: Visualizing Participatory Resilience Building 
Yanjun Cai, University of Toronto


Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Mackenzie (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.10 Enhancing Education and Urban Life
Teaching housing policy and environmental design through a studio-based collaborative exploration of student housing models
Luisa Sotomayor, York University; Laura Taylor, York University; Shelagh McCartney, Ryerson University


Urban and Non-Urban Differences in Public School Educators’ Reliance on Brokers to Bridge the Research-Practice Gap 
Jennifer Watling Neal, Michigan State University; Zachary Neal, Michigan State University; Camren Wilson, Michigan State University


IHU: Can Texting Be Used to Improve College Enrollment and Persistence for Urban Public School Students? 
Ryan Yeung, Hunter College; Phuong Nguyen, University of Iowa


Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Huron (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.11 The Planning Practice in Face of Gender, Race, Class and Disabilities 
Provincializing Planning: Urban planning and imperial power 
Yasminah Beebeejaun, University College London


Segregation by Design. A Call for Action
Catalina Freixas, Washington University in St. Louis; Mark Abbott, Harris-Stowe State University


Who, What, and Where: Reversing the Gaze onto the Researchers 
Elizabeth L. Sweet, Temple University; Rickie Sanders, Temple University; Donna Marie Peters, Temple University


Women, Mobility, and Transportation: Incorporating a Gender-Specific Lens in Transportation Planning 
Josephine Hazelton, California State University, Stanislaus; Gerard Wellman, California State University, Stanislaus


Disability Perspectives: A Primer for Planners 
Timothy Ross, University of Toronto; Ronald Buliung, University of Toronto Mississauga; Paul Hess, University of Toronto; Paul Hess, University of Toronto


Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Simcoe (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.12 Climate Risks Management in Rapidly Developing Cities
Urbanization and a rapidly changing climate present enormous challenges to cities everywhere, but particularly in Southeast Asia where so many urban areas are located on coastlines or major river systems. The challenges faced by cities in this region have accelerated and will continue to do so as the area is experiencing dramatic economic and societal transformation. The percentage of people living in urban areas within the Mekhong sub-region is predicted to rise from today’s rate of 47% to 56% by 2030. Concomitantly, climate change is causing hydro-meteorological events to be more intense and frequent with the frequency of floods and storms increasing by more than 7% on average per year during the past decade. Political-economic processes are contributing to climate risks unequally affecting small cities in the GMS. Socioeconomic inequality is rising in the region (Asian Development Bank 2012, Phongpaichit and Baker 2015). But also, power structures are highly unequal and autocratic, and there is limited political space for reform (Strangio 2014; Garschagen 2015). Consequently, the poorest often suffer the most from the effects of climate change due to their limited assets, the locations where they live, and the state’s failure to protect them. In contrast, elites have often been able to use the state to accumulate social surpluses in areas where they live and work at the expense of others (Taylor 2014).


This session brings together case studies of Southeast Asian cities that have recently dealt with climate-related disasters and describes how stakeholders in the cities prepared for and responded to the events from a critical perspective. The final paper in the session helps to contextualize the case studies by focusing on some of the common themes and lessons learned through the individual papers describing particular cities and their circumstances.


Moderator: Amrita Daniere, University of Toronto 


Flood Vulnerability and Resilience in Peri-Urbanizing Vietnam: A Case Study from Ninh Binh Province, Vietnam
Hue Le, Vietnam National University; Ly Bui, Vietnam National University


Flood: Impact and Responses in Khon Kaen City, Thailand
Astrud Beringer, Mahasarakham University; Jutamas Kaewsuk, Mahasarakham University


Urbanization and the Urban Master Plan of Vientiane: Issues and Prospects
Thanousorn Vongpraseuth, National University of Laos; Soukanh Chithpanya, National University of Laos


Enhancing Urban Climate Change Resilience in Southeast Asia: Stories From the Field
Amrita Daniere, University of Toronto


Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Roosevelt (2nd Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.14 Regeneration, Resilience and Urban Production

Reuse for Production. How New Forms of Production Are Reshaping North-American Cities 
Caterina Montipò, Politecnico di Torino; Maicol Negrello, Politecnico di Torino


Regeneration as Resilience Strategy: Adapting to Climate Change Through Vacant Land Conversion 
Galen Newman, Texas A&M University; Domonic Bearfield, Texas A&M University; Siyu Yu, Texas A&M University; Siyu Yu, Texas A&M University; Ryun Jung Lee, Texas A&M University; You Jung Kim, Texas A&M University


Latino Placemaking: Cultural Resiliency and Strategies for Re-urbanization 
Jesus Lara, The Ohio State University


The Proliferation of Pedestrian Malls in Post-War American Planning: A Case of Idea Exchange in Urban Renewal, Municipal Government, and State Law 
Kelly Gregg, University of Toronto


Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Chestnut East (Mezzanine Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.15 Transportation Needs and Access of the Disadvantaged
Our Mobility, a Study of Transportation Disadvantage in New York City 
Jessica Murray, CUNY Graduate Center


The Transportation Needs of Refugees: An examination of Arab Refugees in Buffalo, NY 
Yasmein Okour, University at Buffalo


Transit Access to Employment in Canada: Taking Stock of Income Inequalities 
Jeff Allen, University of Toronto; Steven Farber, University of Toronto


The Dynamic Public Transport Landscape in Everyday Practice 
Xia Hua, National University of Singapore


Transport Inaccessibility as a Barrier to Participation: The Case of Toronto’s Suburban Towers 
Steven Farber, University of Toronto Scarborough; Mischa Young, University of Toronto; Nate Wessel, University of Toronto; Nate Wessel, University of Toronto; Zachary Patterson, Concordia University

Speakers
avatar for Yasmein Okour, University at Buffalo

Yasmein Okour, University at Buffalo

Doctoral Student, University at Buffalo SUNY
avatar for Jessica Murray, CUNY Graduate Center

Jessica Murray, CUNY Graduate Center

Ph.D. Student, City University of New York - Graduate Center
Psychology student studying developmental impacts of transportation disadvantage for adults with disabilities.
avatar for Steven Farber

Steven Farber

Assistant Professor, University of Toronto Scarborough
I am a quantitative transportation geographer and spatial analyst. My research program investigates how land use and transportation systems affect social and economic outcomes of urban areas. At the core of my research philosophy is the belief that travel behavior is a means through... Read More →
avatar for Xia Hua, National University of Singapore

Xia Hua, National University of Singapore

National University of Singapore

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Willow West (Mezzanine Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.16 Land Use Planning and Urban Development Strategies
Boundaries for the Ultimate Urban Growth Control in Chinese Cities 
Yiping Fang, Portland State University


Politics and the Bureaucracy: Exploring Land Value Capture Approaches Tools in Toronto and São Paulo 
Abigail Friendly, Utrecht University


Planning the Micro-neighborhood: An Effective Response to Urban Decline? 
Robin Boyle, Wayne State University


Estimating the Limits of a 'Missing Middle' Housing Strategy in the Toronto Region
Indro Bhattacharyya, Region of Peel; Chun Nam Law, Region of Peel


Development Regulations Reduce Land Utilization Efficiency in India Cities 
Sweta Byahut, Auburn University; Bimal Patel, CEPT University; Jignesh Mehta, HCP Design, Planning and Manangement Pvt. Ltd.


Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Willow East (Mezzanine Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.17 Fostering Local Economies Through Labor Incentives and Jobs Creation
Cooperative Cities: Municipal Support for Worker Cooperatives and Equitable Economic Development in the United States 
Stacey Sutton, University of Illinois at Chicago


Disruptions and Development: Airbnb’s Impact on Workers 
Eric Joseph Van Holm, Arizona State University


The Economic Redevelopment Proposal: Narrating Redundancy in the Competition for Revitalization Funding 
Patricia Tweet, St. John Fisher College



Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Willow Centre (Mezzanine Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.19 What is so Different About Urban Politics and Elections?

Big Changes in the Big Easy: An Analysis of the 2017 New Orleans Mayoral Election 
Robert Collins, Dillard University


Is Local Politics Still Local? Big City Politics in Transition 
Richard Stren, University of Toronto; Yue Zhang, University of Illinois at Chicago


Who has School Spirit? Voter Turnout in Canadian School Board Elections 
Michael McGregor, Ryerson University


Racial Gerrymandering of Municipal Borders: Direct Democracy, Participatory Democracy, and Voting Rights in the United States 
Noah J. Durst, Michigan State University







Speakers
avatar for Robert Collins, Dillard University

Robert Collins, Dillard University

Conrad Hilton Endowed Professor of Urban Studies and Public Policy, Dillard University
Robert Collins is Conrad Hilton Endowed Professor of Urban Studies and Public Policy at Dillard University in New Orleans. Other positions he has held at Dillard include: Associate Provost and Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Founding Dean of the College of Arts and... Read More →

Moderator
avatar for Robert Collins, Dillard University

Robert Collins, Dillard University

Conrad Hilton Endowed Professor of Urban Studies and Public Policy, Dillard University
Robert Collins is Conrad Hilton Endowed Professor of Urban Studies and Public Policy at Dillard University in New Orleans. Other positions he has held at Dillard include: Associate Provost and Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Founding Dean of the College of Arts and... Read More →

Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Pine East (Mezzanine Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.20 The Platform Economy and the City II
The Platform Economy is changing the way cities live, work, and are governed. Though the benefits to consumers is self-apparent, the externalities often are not. Papers in this panel explores the urban impacts - both good and bad - that internet-platform companies like Uber, AirBnB, and TaskRabbit bring, and then make recommendations on how to best integrate/regulate this new industry into municipalities.


Moderator: Austin Zwick, University of Toronto 


The Urban Geography of Short-Term Rentals 
David Wachsmuth, McGill University


Subsidized Homeownership: Deepening Urban Inequality through Airbnb 
Pablo Mendez, Carleton University


Trustless Systems and the Future of Economic Value: Emerging Issues and Implications 
Will Seaward, University of Waterloo


Disrupting Stuff: Material Flows in the Platform City Clarence 
Woudsma, University of Waterloo


The Platform Economy and Levels of Sociotechnical Organization
Jon Woodside, University of Waterloo


Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Pine West (Mezzanine Floor)

11:10am

FR11.10.21 Metropolitan Planning, Cooperation and Reform
Metropolitan Government in East Africa: Structure, Function and Innovation 
Christopher Gore, Ryerson University


Sydney’s End Game: Path Dependency and the Limits to Urban Reform 
Bligh Grant, University of Technology Sydney


Whither Regionalism: The Salience of Megaregional Geographies for Interregional Land Use and Transportation Planning and Policy Making 
Michael Oden, University of Texas at Austin


A Bottom-up Approach Towards Metropolitan Integration – Reasons for Cooperation. A Case Study of the Gdańsk-Gdynia-Sopot Metropolitan Area 
Rafał Gajewski, University of Gdańsk


Metropolitan Governance Cooperation and CO2 Transport Emission: A Three-Level Hierarchical Linear Model Analysis 
Victor Osei Kwadwo, Maastricht University; Tatiana Skripka, Maastricht University

Speakers
Moderator
avatar for Bligh Grant, University of Technology Sydney

Bligh Grant, University of Technology Sydney

Associate Professor, University of Technology Sydney
I am a political scientist specialising in local government studies, particularly in Australia but also in international comparative perspective. Australia-U.S.-Canada comparative material has waned in recent years and us coming to UAA is to establish links in North America. My co-authored... Read More →

Friday April 6, 2018 11:10am - 12:35pm
Cedar (Mezzanine Floor)

12:35pm

2:04pm

Concurrent Sessions
Friday April 6, 2018 2:04pm - 3:30pm
TBA

2:05pm

FR2.05.18 Thinking the City: Bob Beauregard on the City as Theory, Politics, Materiality
Robert Beauregard’s scholarship has led the field of urban studies for more than forty years. In nine books and hundreds of articles, essays, commentaries, and reviews, his wide-ranging contributions have defined the contours of debate on urban theory, planning theory, urban history, postmodernism, urban revitalization, urban decline, gentrification, anti-urbanism, edge cities, suburbanization, urban property markets, urban materiality, built form, and more, in every case challenging, informing, and advancing knowledge in the field. Panelists including current and former students, co-authors, research collaborators, and colleagues will discuss Professor Beauregard’s manifold contributions to urban scholarship, highlighting their influence on the field of urban studies and on panelists’ own research and understanding in their particular areas of inquiry. The colloquy will both acknowledge the work of a leading urban scholar as well as offer insights on the production, transmission, and development of knowledge in the multidisciplinary field of urban affairs.


Moderator: Kathe Newman, Rutgers University

Building Material: What Bob (and Science and Technology Studies) Can Teach Us About Construction Cycles 
Rachel Weber, University of Illinois, Chicago

Re-Thinking Stability and Change in the City: Reflections on Planning Matter 
Laura Lieto, University of Naples

Robert Beauregard's Foundational Thinking on Gentrification 
Laura Wolf Powers, Hunter College

Learning to Write Haiti's Planning History 
Sophonie Joseph, Columbia University

Decline, Development, Difference - Bob's Deep Dives Keep Teaching Planners How to Do Better
Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh

Bob Beauregard and Co-Authorship 
Briavel Holcomb, Rutgers University

Speakers
avatar for Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh

Sabina Deitrick, University of Pittsburgh

University of Pittsburgh
Sabina Deitrick, PhD, is Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs and Director of Urban and Regional Analysis program at the University Center for Social and Urban Research (UCSUR) at the University of Pittsburgh.  Her research focuses on issues... Read More →
avatar for Sophonie Milande Joseph, Columbia University

Sophonie Milande Joseph, Columbia University

Ph.D. Candidate in Urban Planning, Columbia University

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 2:05pm - 3:30pm
City Hall Room (2nd Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.01 Planning for Community Participation
Layering Community Engagement Techniques to Influence Local Policy 
Danielle Spurlock, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Local Determinants of Opportunity in Urban America 
Sowmya Balachandran, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign; Andrew Greenlee, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign 


Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) and the Role of Grassroots Efforts 
Juan Antonio Sorto, Texas Southern University 


Condo Development and Undemocratic Urban Governance 
Stefan Treffers, York University; Randy Lippert, University of Windsor 


Activating Students and Community: Sustainable Urban Design Strategies 
Rebekah Radtke, University of Kentucky; Patrick Lee Lucas, University of Kentucky


Friday April 6, 2018 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Churchill (2nd Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.02 Characteristics and Consequences of Neighborhood Environments

Did Resident Concerns About Affordable Housing Come True? A Before-After Study of Six Sites in Colorado 
Carrie Makarewicz, University of Colorado Denver; Jennifer Steffel Johnson, University of Colorado Denver

Modeling the Determinants of Neighborhood Quality
Danielle R. Rohret, University of Louisville

Do People Grocery Shop Near Home? Examining Individual, Household, and Neighborhood Characteristics Associated With Shopping Close to Home 
Cristian Meier, University of Iowa; Megan Gilster, University of Iowa

Speakers
avatar for Danielle R. Rohret, University of Louisville

Danielle R. Rohret, University of Louisville

University of Louisville
MPP, University of Northern IowaGraduate StudentUrban and Public AffairsUniversity of Louisville

Moderator
avatar for Carrie Makarewicz, University of Colorado – Denver

Carrie Makarewicz, University of Colorado – Denver

Assistant Professor, University of Colorado Denver
University of Colorado Denver

Friday April 6, 2018 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Elgin (2nd Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.03 Discourse, Framing and Meaning in Urban Areas
Planning and Marketing Stacked Townhouses in the "Grown Up" Suburbs of the Toronto Region Katherine Perrott, University of Toronto

Labels Matter: Homeowners’ Attitudes Towards Affordable Housing, Low-Income Housing, and Workforce Housing 
Cody Price, The Ohio State University

Understanding and Overcoming Negative Perceptions about Public Housing 
Suzanne Leland, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Dustin Read, Virginia Tech


Friday April 6, 2018 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Wentworth (2nd Floor)

2:05pm

FR2.05.05 Sustainability City Models and Measurements
Seattle’s Emerging Social Economy and the Politics of Globalization
 Jerome Hodos, Franklin and Marshall College ,

Overcoming the "Development Deficit": The Vital Role of Sustainable City Models
Jill Tao, Incheon National University ,

Safeguarding Against Socio-spatial Inequality in Environmentally Sustainable Cities
Allison Bridges, Columbia University

Speakers
avatar for Jill Tao, Incheon National University

Jill Tao, Incheon National University

Associate Professor, Incheon National University
Mayors in East Asia, how to measure Confucian norms in local government, global bureaucrats and environmental issues.

Moderator

Friday April 6, 2018 2:05pm - 3:30pm
Maple East (Mezzanine Floor)
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