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Friday, April 6 • 3:30pm - 4:00pm
FR3.30.25 Somali Incorporation in Urban Sweden

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This project builds upon my book, Somalis in the Twin Cities and Columbus: Immigrant Incorporation in New Destinations (Temple University Press, 2017) by applying a similar methodology to the study of Somali incorporation in Sweden, a country with one of the largest Somali populations in Europe. Somalis have sought refuge in Sweden due to the generous social welfare benefits and liberal refugee policy. However, less well known is that Somalis in Sweden experience employment barriers, housing challenges and educational inequality (Carlson 2014). Recent attacks on Swedish refugee policy, by leaders like President Trump and members of Sweden’s anti-immigrant Democratic Party make the situation more challenging for Somalis in Sweden. It is important that political leaders accept Somali refugees who face significant danger if they are returned to their volatile homeland. This proposal speaks directly to this human rights situation by examining how well Somalis are incorporated politically, economically, and socially in Sweden. It will also identify ways policy makers can increase incorporation in each area.


My project is extremely timely. Because inaccurate information about Somalis and other Muslim immigrants is prevalent, it is imperative that fact-based research on the many benefits of these new communities be conducted. My previous research indicates that Somalis in the US play important roles as participants in the democratic process, occupy important low-skill jobs that help the local economy, and add rich cultural diversity to their local communities. Misperceptions about Somali communities diverts attention from the many positive contributions being made by these migrants and results in missed opportunities to incorporate refugees in their new homes.


This poster will present preliminary comparisons between the Somali diaspora in Sweden and the US to better understand the Swedish case.


Stefanie Chambers, Trinity College


Friday April 6, 2018 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Provincial Ballroom (2nd Floor)